Betting Clerks take bets from customers at betting agencies, over the telephone and on course.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Most workers have Year 11 and 10 as their highest level of education. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • taking bets and debiting credit accounts and bank accounts electronically, and receiving cash
  • recording and entering bets electronically and in transaction ledgers
  • issuing tickets and preparing summaries of transactions
  • monitoring amounts of money placed on race entrants
  • checking details and numbers on winning betting tickets against those in betting ledgers and electronic records, and paying out money on winning tickets
  • verifying the identity and account balances of betting agency customers
  • answering betting inquiries over the telephone, via email and in person
  • may work in a call centre

Job Titles

  • Betting Agency Counter Clerk
  • Bookmaker's Clerk, or Penciller
  • Telephone Betting Clerk
  • Betting Clerks
  • Betting Agency Counter Clerk

    Records and processes customer bets, payments and payouts over the counter at a betting agency for horse and dog racing, and other sports and events.

  • Bookmaker's Clerk, or Penciller

    Assists Bookmakers to provide oncourse betting services at race meetings. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Bagman/woman

  • Telephone Betting Clerk

    Records and processes customer bets and account details over the telephone for horse and dog racing, and other sports events. May work in a call centre.

  • Betting Clerks

    Includes Bingo Caller, Keno Terminal Operator

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 5,200 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 54.7% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • Unavailable Average full-time
  • 50 years Average age
  • 71.0% female Gender Share

The number of Betting Clerks grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to stay fairly stable over the next 5 years:
from 5,200 in 2017 to 5,100 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 3,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created (a large number for an occupation of this size).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Betting Clerks work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Arts and Recreation Services; Accommodation and Food Services; and Administrative and Support Services.
  • Full-time: More than half work full-time (54.7%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%), but there are many opportunites to work part-time.
  • Age: The average age is 50 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 71% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20073500
20082600
20094700
20102900
20113700
20122300
20132000
20142400
20154500
20161200
20175200
20225100

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Arts and Recreation Services72.7
Accommodation and Food Services26.4
Administrative and Support Services0.8
Other Industries0.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateBetting ClerksAll Jobs Average
NSW28.931.6
VIC24.726.2
QLD12.319.7
SA11.96.7
WA10.210.8
TAS4.12.0
NT7.81.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketBetting ClerksAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196.6-5.25.2
20-249.0-9.99.9
25-3411.7-23.623.6
35-4425.7-21.721.7
45-5421.5-20.820.8
55-591.8-8.88.8
60-642.6-6.06.0
65 and Over21.1-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Most workers have Year 11 and 10 as their highest level of education. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Racing VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Betting Clerks who have a high attention to detail, provide good customer service and are reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    82% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Mathematics

    78% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. English Language

    60% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Economics and Accounting

    53% Important

    Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data.

  5. Computers and Electronics

    52% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-3012.00 - Gaming and Sports Book Writers and Runners.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    82% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Getting Information

    73% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    72% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Building Good Relationships

    70% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  5. Processing Information

    66% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-3012.00 - Gaming and Sports Book Writers and Runners.

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