Clay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Processing Machine Operators operate machines to manufacture and finish a variety of clay, concrete, glassware and stone products by extruding, shaping, mixing, grinding, cutting and other processes.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Tasks

  • monitoring the flow of clay and other raw materials and products into machines, and adjusting valves and controls to specifications
  • positioning clay and stone on machines to be cut and worked
  • operating concrete mixing, stacking and splitting machines
  • setting up and installing moulds and other machine fixtures
  • setting up and operating glass-making machines to produce molten glass, and regulating temperature of molten glass
  • pressing and blowing glass into moulds to form glassware products
  • collecting and examining samples for conformity to specifications and adjusting machine settings accordingly
  • setting grinding and cutting edges
  • using hand tools to cut, inscribe and polish roughly hewn stone to finished condition

Job Titles

  • Clay Products Machine Operator
  • Concrete Products Machine Operator
  • Glass Production Machine Operator
  • Stone Processing Machine Operator
  • Other Clay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Processing Machine Operators
  • Clay Products Machine Operator

    Operates machines to manufacture clay products, such as bricks, tiles, insulators, porcelain and pottery, by shaping and firing clay.

    Specialisations: Brick Extruder Operator, Porcelain Turner, Slip Caster

  • Concrete Products Machine Operator

    Operates machines to manufacture moulded concrete products such as cement pipes and fittings, concrete railway sleepers, concrete bricks, tiles and paving blocks, structural beams, building panels and cast products.

    Specialisations: Concrete Pipe Machine Operator, Concrete Precast Moulder, Concrete Tile Machine Operator

  • Glass Production Machine Operator

    Operates machines to manufacture molten glass and shape glassware products such as containers, sheet glass, structural and stained glass, glass lenses and prisms.

    Specialisations: Glass Furnace Operator, Glass Laminating Operator, Glass Maker, Glass Melt Operator, Glass Toughening Operator, Glassware Maker

  • Stone Processing Machine Operator

    Operates machines to cut and finish stones for tiles, building blocks and facings.

    Specialisations: Marble Cutter, Stone Polisher, Stone Sawyer

  • Other Clay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Processing Machine Operators

    Includes Brake Lining Maker, Fibre Cement Moulder, Plaster Caster, Plaster Machine Operator

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 2,000 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 88.1% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41.9 hours Average full-time
  • 40 years Average age
  • 3.3% female Gender Share

The number of Clay, Concrete, Glass & Stone Machine Operators fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 2,000 in 2017 to 1,900 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 1,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Clay, Concrete, Glass & Stone Machine Operators work in many regions of Australia. Many work in South Australia or Western Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Construction; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (88.1%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41.9 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 40 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 3.3% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20073900
20085100
20094300
20103100
20113700
20123700
20132800
20142900
20152300
20162600
20172000
20221900

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing59.6
Construction24.2
Wholesale Trade10.3
Arts and Recreation Services3.3
Other Industries2.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateClay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Machine OperatorsAll Jobs Average
NSW23.031.6
VIC20.626.2
QLD13.819.7
SA20.06.7
WA22.710.8
TAS0.02.0
NT0.01.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketClay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Machine OperatorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-193.3-5.25.2
20-2410.1-9.99.9
25-3413.3-23.623.6
35-4434.8-21.721.7
45-5431.4-20.820.8
55-592.3-8.88.8
60-642.9-6.06.0
65 and Over1.9-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Manufactured Mineral Products VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Clay, Concrete, Glass & Stone Machine Operators who are reliable, hardworking and can interact well with others.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Production and Processing

    81% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Fine Arts

    77% Important

    Compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

  3. Sales and Marketing

    70% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  4. Design

    67% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  5. Customer and Personal Service

    66% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9195.05 - Potters, Manufacturing.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Thinking Creatively

    94% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

  2. Handling and Moving Objects

    86% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  3. Performing General Physical Activities

    85% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  4. Controlling Machines and Processes

    83% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    79% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9195.05 - Potters, Manufacturing.

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