Aquaculture Workers perform routine tasks in breeding and raising fish and other aquatic stock.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

Tasks

  • feeding and grading fish, and monitoring their growth
  • assisting with farm layout and constructing nets, long-lines and cages
  • checking and looking after equipment and fish housing
  • operating pumps and other equipment
  • testing and checking on water quality
  • removing dead and dying fish
  • operating lifting equipment such as forklifts and small cranes
  • harvesting fish, and sorting and packing for transportation
  • restocking pens, pools, tanks, ponds, rivers and dams with juvenile fish
  • collecting and recording growth, production and water quality data

Job Titles

  • Aquaculture Worker

    Fast Facts

    • Unavailable Weekly Pay
    • 1,200 workers Employment Size
    • Moderate Future Growth
    • Entry level Skill level rating
    • Higher unemployment Unemployment
    • 59.7% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • Unavailable Average full-time
    • 44 years Average age
    • 13.7% female Gender Share

    The number of Aquaculture Workers grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
    from 1,200 in 2017 to 1,300 by 2022.
    There are likely to be around 1,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
    • Location: Most work in Tasmania or South Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry.
    • Full-time: More than half work full-time (59.7%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%), but there are many opportunites to work part-time.
    • Age: The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 13.7% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
    YearNumber of Workers
    20071200
    20081300
    20091100
    20101200
    2011800
    2012900
    20131000
    2014900
    20151100
    20162600
    20171200
    20221300

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing100.0

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateAquaculture WorkersAll Jobs Average
    NSW0.031.6
    VIC0.026.2
    QLD0.019.7
    SA35.76.7
    WA0.010.8
    TAS62.12.0
    NT2.11.1
    ACT0.01.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketAquaculture WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-1911.5-5.25.2
    20-2411.4-9.99.9
    25-3412.6-23.623.6
    35-4426.3-21.721.7
    45-5438.1-20.820.8
    55-590.0-8.88.8
    60-640.0-6.06.0
    65 and Over0.0-4.04.0

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Seafood Industry VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Aquaculture Workers who work well in a team, are reliable and responsible.

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Administration and Management

      60% Important

      Planning and coordination of people and resources.

    2. Customer and Personal Service

      57% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    3. Biology

      55% Important

      Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

    4. Production and Processing

      54% Important

      Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

    5. English Language

      53% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 45-2093.00 - Farmworkers, Farm, Ranch, and Aquacultural Animals.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

    1. Handling and Moving Objects

      87% Important

      Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

    2. Performing General Physical Activities

      81% Important

      Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

    3. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

      80% Important

      Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

    4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

      79% Important

      Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

    5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

      79% Important

      Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 45-2093.00 - Farmworkers, Farm, Ranch, and Aquacultural Animals.

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