Policy and Planning Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate policy advice and strategic planning within organisations.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. Around one in two workers have a Post Graduate degree.

Tasks

  • developing, implementing and monitoring strategic plans, programs, policies, processes, systems and procedures to achieve goals, objectives and work standards
  • developing, implementing, administering and participating in policy research and analysis
  • coordinating the implementation of policies and practices
  • establishing activity measures and measurements of accountability
  • overseeing and participating in the development of policy documents and reports
  • consulting with and providing expert advice to government officials and board members on policy, program and legislative issues
  • representing the organisation in negotiations, and at conventions, seminars, public hearings and forums convened to discuss policy issues

Job Titles

  • Policy and Planning Manager
  • Policy and Planning Manager (also called Public Policy Manager)

    Specialisations: Corporate Planning Manager, Strategic Planning Manager

Fast Facts

  • $2,146 Weekly Pay
  • 22,000 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 88.4% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 40.4 hours Average full-time
  • 44.5 years Average age
  • 52.8% female Gender Share

The number of Policy and Planning Managers fell over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
from 22,000 in 2018 to 22,500 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 15,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 3,000 a year).

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Policy and Planning Managers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in The Australian Capital Territory.
  • Industries: Most work in Public Administration and Safety; Financial and Insurance Services; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $2,146 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (88.4%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 40.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 45 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (50.2%).
  • Gender: 52.8% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
200820000
200917500
201022200
201125100
201225100
201322700
201422600
201520600
201620400
201721900
201822000
202322500

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsPolicy and Planning ManagersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings21461230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Public Administration and Safety50.3
Financial and Insurance Services8.4
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services7.1
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services6.3
Other Industries27.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePolicy and Planning ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW28.531.6
VIC25.526.2
QLD11.219.7
SA3.06.7
WA5.710.8
TAS1.82.0
NT1.41.1
ACT22.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPolicy and Planning ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-3414.7-23.623.6
35-4435.2-21.721.7
45-5432.1-20.820.8
55-5911.2-8.88.8
60-646.0-6.06.0
65 and Over0.9-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationPolicy and Planning ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate45-8.68.6
Bachelor degree34.9-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma14.2-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV0-18.918.9
Year 125.9-18.718.7
Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job.
Around one in two workers have a Post Graduate degree.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Public Sector and Business Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Policy and Planning Managers who have strong people skills and can communicate clearly.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Administration and Management

    95% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  2. Personnel and Human Resources

    82% Important

    Recruiting and training people. Managing pay and other entitlements like sick and holiday leave. Negotiating pay and conditions.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    82% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. English Language

    81% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Law and Government

    78% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-1011.00 - Chief Executives.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    95% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  2. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    95% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  3. Getting Information

    94% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    92% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

  5. Guiding, Directing and Motivating Staff

    91% Important

    Guiding and directing staff, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-1011.00 - Chief Executives.

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