Research and Development Managers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate research and development activities within organisations.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job. Around three in five workers have a Post Graduate degree.

Tasks

  • determining, implementing and monitoring research and development strategies, policies and plans
  • developing and implementing research projects, priorities and targets to support commercial and policy developments
  • leading major research projects and coordinating activities of other research workers
  • assessing the benefits and monitoring the costs and effectiveness of research and development activities
  • interpreting results of research projects and recommending associated product and service development innovations
  • providing advice on research and development options available to the organisation
  • monitoring leading-edge developments in relevant disciplines and assessing implications for the organisation
  • may publish results of significant research projects

Job Titles

  • Research and Development Manager

    Fast Facts

    • $1,669 Weekly Pay
    • 12,600 workers Employment Size
    • Very strong Future Growth
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 79.3% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 37.2 hours Average full-time
    • 40.5 years Average age
    • 49.1% female Gender Share

    The number of Research and Development Managers grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow very strongly over the next 5 years:
    from 12,600 in 2017 to 14,800 by 2022.
    There are likely to be around 11,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

    • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
    • Location: Research and Development Managers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Victoria.
    • Industries: They work in many industries such as Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Education and Training; and Public Administration and Safety.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,669 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (79.3%, higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 37.2 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 49.1% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200711500
    200812500
    20099900
    201010500
    201110100
    201210200
    201312600
    201411200
    20158600
    201612800
    201712600
    202214800

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsResearch and Development ManagersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings16691230

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services20.3
    Education and Training16.1
    Public Administration and Safety11.4
    Health Care and Social Assistance9.2
    Other Industries43.0

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateResearch and Development ManagersAll Jobs Average
    NSW26.031.6
    VIC40.226.2
    QLD16.319.7
    SA6.46.7
    WA5.810.8
    TAS0.62.0
    NT0.71.1
    ACT3.91.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketResearch and Development ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.0-5.25.2
    20-241.9-9.99.9
    25-3427.2-23.623.6
    35-4427.6-21.721.7
    45-5427.6-20.820.8
    55-598.9-8.88.8
    60-645.2-6.06.0
    65 and Over1.7-4.04.0

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationResearch and Development ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate61.5-8.68.6
    Bachelor degree38.5-17.917.9
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma0-10.110.1
    Certificate III/IV0-18.918.9
    Year 120-18.718.7
    Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
    Below Year 100-8.18.1

    A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience is usually needed to work in this job.
    Around three in five workers have a Post Graduate degree.

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Research and Development Managers who are organised, with strong people skills and strong attention to detail.

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Mathematics

      96% Important

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    2. Computers and Electronics

      80% Important

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    3. English Language

      70% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    4. Engineering and Technology

      64% Important

      Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

    5. Production and Processing

      62% Important

      Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-2031.00 - Operations Research Analysts.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

    1. Interacting With Computers

      95% Important

      Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

    2. Analyzing Data or Information

      94% Important

      Looking at, working with, and understanding data or information.

    3. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

      93% Important

      Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

    4. Getting Information

      92% Important

      Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

    5. Thinking Creatively

      90% Important

      Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-2031.00 - Operations Research Analysts.

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