Financial Dealers conduct financial market transactions on behalf of clients.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Many Financial Brokers have a university degree. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • obtaining information on securities, market conditions, government regulations and financial circumstances of clients
  • interpreting data from securities reports, financial periodicals and stock-quotation viewer screens
  • analysing financial markets and financial market products
  • providing information and offering advice on financial market matters, market conditions and the history and prospects of corporations
  • executing buy and sell orders in the market place on behalf of clients
  • relaying trade information to clients such as the number of contracts bought and sold and the price
  • monitoring futures prices and market changes, and bidding for commodity futures contracts
  • recording and transmitting buy and sell orders
  • calculating and recording costs of transactions

Job Titles

  • Financial or Money Market Dealer
  • Futures Trader
  • Stockbroking Dealer, Sharebroker, or Stockbroker
  • Other Financial Dealers
  • Financial or Money Market Dealer

    Buys and sells securities within financial markets, and trades and distributes financial securities on behalf of financial institutions. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Derivatives Trader, Fixed Interest Dealer, Foreign Exchange Dealer, Securities Dealer

  • Futures Trader

    Buys and sells commodity futures on behalf of clients. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Stockbroking Dealer, Sharebroker, or Stockbroker

    Buys and sells stocks and bonds on behalf of clients. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Trading Floor Operator (Stock Exchange)

  • Other Financial Dealers

    Includes Equities Analyst. Registration or licensing may be required.

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 18,800 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 87.3% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 40.5 hours Average full-time
  • 38 years Average age
  • 27.3% female Gender Share

The number of Financial Dealers grew moderately over the past 5 years and is expected to stay fairly stable over the next 5 years:
from 18,800 in 2017 to 18,700 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 8,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Financial Dealers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in New South Wales.
  • Industries: Most work in Financial and Insurance Services; Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services; and Accommodation and Food Services.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (87.3%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 40.5 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 38 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 27.3% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200726900
200830700
200921500
201024000
201118600
201217600
201318100
201417300
201515600
201615800
201718800
202218700

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Financial and Insurance Services88.0
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services2.1
Accommodation and Food Services2.0
Public Administration and Safety1.8
Other Industries6.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateFinancial DealersAll Jobs Average
NSW46.631.6
VIC30.326.2
QLD9.719.7
SA2.16.7
WA9.810.8
TAS0.62.0
NT0.31.1
ACT0.71.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketFinancial DealersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-244.1-9.99.9
25-3436.3-23.623.6
35-4426.2-21.721.7
45-5422.8-20.820.8
55-595.0-8.88.8
60-641.8-6.06.0
65 and Over3.8-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Many Financial Brokers have a university degree. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Financial Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Financial Dealers who provide good customer service and who have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Economics and Accounting

    81% Important

    Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data.

  2. English Language

    76% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    72% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Mathematics

    71% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Computers and Electronics

    71% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-3031.03 - Securities and Commodities Traders.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Interacting With Computers

    90% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  2. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Processing Information

    80% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

  4. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    79% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  5. Building Good Relationships

    79% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-3031.03 - Securities and Commodities Traders.

go to top