ICT Sales Professionals manage client accounts and represent companies in selling a range of computer hardware, software and other ICT goods and services to industrial, business, professional and other organisations.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Many workers have not had any formal training after finished high school. Relevant vendor certification may also be useful.

Tasks

  • compiling lists of prospective client businesses using trade directories and other sources
  • acquiring and updating knowledge of employer's and competitors' goods and services, and market conditions
  • visiting regular and prospective client businesses to establish and act on selling opportunities
  • assessing customers' needs and explaining the goods and services which meet their needs
  • promoting employers' ICT goods and services to existing and prospective clients
  • quoting and negotiating prices and credit terms, and completing contracts and recording orders
  • arranging delivery of goods, installation of equipment and the provision of services
  • reporting to sales management on sales made and the marketability of ICT goods and services
  • following up with clients to ensure satisfaction with ICT goods and services purchased, arranging modifications and resolving any problems arising
  • preparing sales reports, and maintaining and submitting records of business expenses incurred

Job Titles

  • ICT Account Manager
  • ICT Business Development Manager
  • ICT Sales Representative
  • ICT Account Manager

    Manages sale of computer hardware, software and services to existing account clients and identifies further sales opportunities within these accounts, builds new account clients, manages customer satisfaction and retention, and coordinates the preparation and presentation of ICT sales proposals and tenders.

  • ICT Business Development Manager

    Identifies and generates new ICT business opportunities to further improve market share and awareness by gaining an understanding of customers' ICT needs and promoting goods and services to these customers. May manage some key customer accounts.

  • ICT Sales Representative

    Develops and converts sales opportunities into sales of computer hardware, software and ICT services.

Fast Facts

  • $1,948 Weekly Pay
  • 11,600 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 91.8% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41.1 hours Average full-time
  • 42 years Average age
  • 31.5% female Gender Share

The number of ICT Sales Professionals fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 11,600 in 2017 to 10,300 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 5,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: ICT Sales Professionals work in many regions of Australia. Many work in New South Wales.
  • Industries: Most work in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Wholesale Trade; and Retail Trade.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,948 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (91.8%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41.1 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 31.5% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200710300
200816100
200915000
201012800
201115000
201214300
201314700
201413200
201514800
201616300
201711600
202210300

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsICT Sales ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings19481230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services56.9
Wholesale Trade11.8
Retail Trade11.2
Information Media and Telecommunications10.9
Other Industries9.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateICT Sales ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW47.831.6
VIC25.726.2
QLD8.119.7
SA4.76.7
WA8.610.8
TAS0.32.0
NT0.31.1
ACT4.51.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketICT Sales ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.9-5.25.2
20-246.7-9.99.9
25-3431.8-23.623.6
35-4418.6-21.721.7
45-5425.1-20.820.8
55-596.5-8.88.8
60-647.0-6.06.0
65 and Over3.3-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Many workers have not had any formal training after finished high school. Relevant vendor certification may also be useful.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Information and Communications Technology VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for ICT Sales Professionals who have strong interpersonal skills and provide good customer service.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    88% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Sales and Marketing

    86% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  3. English Language

    73% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Administration and Management

    63% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  5. Mathematics

    63% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-4011.00 - Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Building Good Relationships

    88% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  2. Getting Information

    73% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    70% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    70% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  5. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    69% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-4011.00 - Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products.

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