Marine Transport Professionals control and manage the operations of ships, boats and marine equipment.

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Workers are more likely to have a Vocational Education and Training qualification than a university degree. Registration or licensing is required.

Tasks

  • directing fishing operations by using knowledge about the species sought, fishing areas, seasons and the capabilities of the vessel and crew
  • directing crew in catching fish, molluscs and crustacea at varying depths using nets, lines, poles, pots and traps
  • planning, controlling and coordinating the operational and maintenance requirements of a ship's propulsion and domestic plant and equipment
  • operating plant and equipment and performing routine maintenance on ship's systems including mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, steam generating, and fire prevention and control systems
  • controlling and directing shipping operations to ensure the safe and efficient loading and transport of cargo and passengers
  • ensuring compliance with regulations pertaining to safety at sea and protection of the marine environment
  • directing the activities of the deck crew for navigational support tasks, berthing and unberthing, maintenance, cleaning and painting of superstructures, and repair and replacement of defective deck gear and equipment
  • navigating a ship by supervising the ship's course and speed according to predetermined passage plans and safety procedures
  • examining and approving design plans of hulls and equipment such as main propulsion engines, auxiliary boilers and turbines, electrical power generating plant, refrigeration and airconditioning plant and pumping systems
  • conducting periodic surveys throughout a ship's life to ensure standards are maintained

Job Titles

  • Master Fisher
  • Ship's or Marine Engineer
  • Ship's Master or Captain
  • Ship's or Deck Officer
  • Marine or Ship's Surveyor
  • Other Marine Transport Professionals
  • Master Fisher

    Controls a fishing vessel and fishing operations to catch and preserve fish, crustacea and molluscs. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Ship's or Marine Engineer

    Controls and manages the operation and maintenance of a ship's plant and equipment. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Mechanical Engineering Officer (Navy), Weapons Electrical Engineering Officer (Navy)

  • Ship's Master or Captain

    Controls and manages the operations of a ship or boat. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Dredge Master, Ship's Pilot, Tug Master

  • Ship's or Deck Officer

    Navigates and controls the safe operation of a ship and supervises and coordinates the activities of deck crew. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Navigating Officer (Ship's), Seaman Officer (Navy)

  • Marine or Ship's Surveyor

    Surveys machines and hulls of ships to ensure they are constructed, equipped and maintained according to safety standards, rules and regulations laid down by marine authorities. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Other Marine Transport Professionals

    Includes Boating Safety Officer, Marine Safety Officer, Vessel Traffic Officer. Registration or licensing is required.

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 8,800 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 93.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 38 hours Average full-time
  • 48.5 years Average age
  • 4.2% female Gender Share

The number of Marine Transport Professionals fell over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 8,800 in 2018 to 9,100 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 2,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 400 a year).

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Marine Transport Professionals work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Queensland.
  • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (93%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 38.0 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 49 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (62.7%).
  • Gender: 4.2% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20086900
200911900
201010700
20118900
20128500
201311100
20149000
20158200
201610200
20178800
20188800
20239100

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing58.9
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing13.7
Public Administration and Safety9.1
Manufacturing9.0
Other Industries9.3

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMarine Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW27.231.6
VIC4.026.2
QLD37.019.7
SA9.56.7
WA14.810.8
TAS4.82.0
NT2.61.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMarine Transport ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-194.6-5.25.2
20-240.4-9.99.9
25-3414.9-23.623.6
35-4417.3-21.721.7
45-5439.9-20.820.8
55-5913.4-8.88.8
60-647.6-6.06.0
65 and Over1.8-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A skill level equal to a Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Workers are more likely to have a Vocational Education and Training qualification than a university degree. Registration or licensing is required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Maritime VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Marine Transport Professionals who work well in a team, can communicate clearly with a diverse range of people and are reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Transportation

    84% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  2. Public Safety and Security

    75% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  3. Law and Government

    68% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  4. Mechanical

    67% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  5. Administration and Management

    67% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-5021.01 - Ship and Boat Captains.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    93% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  2. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    88% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  3. Controlling Machines and Processes

    88% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  4. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    87% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    83% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-5021.01 - Ship and Boat Captains.

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