Fashion, Industrial and Jewellery Designers plan, design, develop and document products for manufacture and prepare designs and specifications of products for mass, batch and one-off production.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Almost three quarters of workers have a university degree. A high level of creativity may also be important.

Tasks

  • determining the objectives and constraints of the design brief by consulting with clients and stakeholders
  • undertaking product research and analysing functional, commercial, cultural and aesthetic requirements
  • formulating design concepts for clothing, textiles, industrial, commercial and consumer products, and jewellery
  • preparing sketches, diagrams, illustrations, plans, samples and models to communicate design concepts
  • negotiating design solutions with clients, management, and sales and manufacturing staff
  • selecting, specifying and recommending functional and aesthetic materials, production methods and finishes for manufacture
  • detailing and documenting the selected design for production
  • preparing and commissioning prototypes and samples
  • supervising the preparation of patterns, programs and tooling, and the manufacture process

Job Titles

  • Fashion Designer
  • Industrial Designer, or Product Designer
  • Jewellery Designer
  • Fashion Designer

    Plans, designs and develops clothing, accessories, footwear or other items of personal apparel considering the form and construction of clothing, historical styles and contexts, contemporary and cultural trends, colour, fabric, and decoration, and the techniques and processes available for manufacture.

    Specialisations: Costume Designer

  • Industrial Designer, or Product Designer

    Plans, designs, develops and documents industrial, commercial or consumer products for manufacture with particular emphasis on ergonomic (human) factors, marketing considerations and manufacturability, and prepares designs and specifications of products for mass or batch production.

    Specialisations: Ceramic Designer, Furniture Designer, Glass Designer, Textile Designer

  • Jewellery Designer

    Conceptualises and designs prototypes and details for the manufacture of jewellery and objects for personal adornment, such as watches and spectacles, homewares and other objects, such as trophies and silverware, using metals, precious stones, plastics, engraving, casting and fabrication, to develop designs for mass or batch production or one-off commissions.

Fast Facts

  • $1,354 Weekly Pay
  • 12,000 workers Employment Size
  • Very strong Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 62.4% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 44.7 hours Average full-time
  • 38.5 years Average age
  • 63.1% female Gender Share

The number of Fashion, Industrial and Jewellery Designers grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow very strongly over the next 5 years:
from 12,000 in 2017 to 14,400 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 7,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Fashion, Industrial and Jewellery Designers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in New South Wales or Victoria.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Retail Trade.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,354 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (62.4%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 44.7 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 39 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 63.1% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20078100
20088900
200910100
201012500
201111200
201210600
20138100
20149500
20159600
201612000
201712000
202214400

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsFashion, Industrial and Jewellery DesignersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings13541230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing45.8
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services23.2
Retail Trade14.9
Wholesale Trade11.3
Other Industries4.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateFashion, Industrial and Jewellery DesignersAll Jobs Average
NSW46.131.6
VIC32.526.2
QLD16.719.7
SA1.76.7
WA2.210.8
TAS0.32.0
NT0.01.1
ACT0.51.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketFashion, Industrial and Jewellery DesignersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-247.6-9.99.9
25-3430.8-23.623.6
35-4423.3-21.721.7
45-5419.1-20.820.8
55-5913.4-8.88.8
60-643.3-6.06.0
65 and Over2.6-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher, or at least 5 years of experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Almost three quarters of workers have a university degree. A high level of creativity may also be important.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Textiles, Clothing & Footwear and Metal and Engineering VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Fashion, Industrial and Jewellery Designers who are creative, can self-manage and are motivated.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Design

    96% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  2. Engineering and Technology

    90% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  3. Production and Processing

    83% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  4. Mechanical

    80% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  5. Computers and Electronics

    76% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-1021.00 - Commercial and Industrial Designers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment

    92% Important

    Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

  2. Thinking Creatively

    90% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

  3. Getting Information

    88% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Interacting With Computers

    83% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    77% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-1021.00 - Commercial and Industrial Designers.

go to top