Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals includes occupations such as Conservators, Metallurgists, Meteorologists and Physicists.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed and most workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Conservators may not need a formal qualification if they have at least 5 years of relevant experience. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • plans and organises the conservation of materials and objects in libraries, archives, museums, art galleries and other institutions
  • researches, develops, controls and provides advice on processes used in extracting metals from their ores, and processes used for casting, alloying, heat treating or welding refined metals, alloys and other materials to produce commercial metal products or develop new alloys and processes. Registration or licensing may be required
  • studies the physics and dynamics of the atmosphere to increase understanding of weather and climate, and to forecast changes in the weather and long-term climatic trends
  • studies matter, space, time, energy, forces and fields and the interrelationship between these physical phenomena to further understanding of the laws governing the behaviour of the universe, and seeks to apply these laws to solve practical problems and discover new information about the earth and the universe.

Job Titles

  • Conservator
  • Metallurgist
  • Meteorologist
  • Physicist
  • Exercise Physiologist
  • Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals
  • Conservator

    Plans and organises the conservation of materials and objects in libraries, archives, museums, art galleries and other institutions.

    Specialisations: Art Conservator

  • Metallurgist

    Researches, develops, controls and provides advice on processes used in extracting metals from their ores, and processes used for casting, alloying, heat treating or welding refined metals, alloys and other materials to produce commercial metal products or develop new alloys and processes. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Hydrometallurgical Engineer, Metallographer, Pyrometallurgical Engineer, Radiological Metallurgist

  • Meteorologist

    Studies the physics and dynamics of the atmosphere to increase understanding of weather and climate, and to forecast changes in the weather and long-term climatic trends.

    Specialisations: Climatologist, Weather Forecaster

  • Physicist

    Studies matter, space, time, energy, forces and fields and the interrelationship between these physical phenomena to further understanding of the laws governing the behaviour of the universe, and seeks to apply these laws to solve practical problems and discover new information about the earth and the universe.

    Specialisations: Astronomer, Medical Physicist

  • Exercise Physiologist

    Assesses, plans and implements exercise programs for preventing and managing chronic diseases and injuries, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, depression, cancer and arthritis, and assists in restoring optimal physical function, health and wellness.

  • Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals

    Includes Materials Scientist, Metrologist, Polymer Scientist, Respiratory Scientist, Sleep Scientist

Fast Facts

  • $1,765 Weekly Pay
  • 9,000 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 68.1% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 39.8 hours Average full-time
  • 35 years Average age
  • 29.0% female Gender Share

The number of Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 9,000 in 2017 to 9,700 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 5,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Health Care and Social Assistance; Mining; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,765 per week (very high compared to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (68.1%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 39.8 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 35 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 29% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20073900
20085400
20098200
20105900
201111400
20128000
20135600
20147800
20159000
20169500
20179000
20229700

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Natural and Physical Science ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings17651230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance46.4
Mining12.8
Public Administration and Safety10.0
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services9.0
Other Industries21.8

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Natural and Physical Science ProfessionalsAll Jobs Average
NSW23.131.6
VIC17.526.2
QLD25.619.7
SA11.06.7
WA16.910.8
TAS3.32.0
NT1.31.1
ACT1.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Natural and Physical Science ProfessionalsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-2411.2-9.99.9
25-3436.8-23.623.6
35-4422.8-21.721.7
45-5420.8-20.820.8
55-595.8-8.88.8
60-640.0-6.06.0
65 and Over2.5-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed and most workers have a university degree. Sometimes relevant experience or on-the-job training is also needed. Conservators may not need a formal qualification if they have at least 5 years of relevant experience. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Training and Education and Community Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Physics

    90% Important

    Physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

  2. Engineering and Technology

    89% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  3. Chemistry

    89% Important

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change. Danger signs and disposal methods.

  4. Mathematics

    86% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. English Language

    79% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-2032.00 - Materials Scientists.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Getting Information

    91% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Analyzing Data or Information

    90% Important

    Looking at, working with, and understanding data or information.

  3. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    88% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  4. Interacting With Computers

    87% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  5. Thinking Creatively

    87% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-2032.00 - Materials Scientists.

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