Teachers of English to Speakers of other Languages teach classes in English to students whose first language is a language other than English.

A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed to work in this job. Nearly all workers have a university degree. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • assessing the extent of language difficulties in students for whom English is a second language
  • teaching students individually and in small groups out of the regular classroom, and assisting students within normal classroom settings
  • teaching students English language skills using a variety of methods including lecture and visual demonstration
  • providing assistance to other classroom teachers by designing special teaching programs for students with English language difficulties
  • designing and producing teaching materials and adapting existing materials
  • preparing course outlines and goals
  • assigning lessons, correcting homework, and preparing and grading exams
  • analysing, recording and reporting progress to regular classroom teachers, parents and students

Job Titles

  • English as a Second Language Teacher

    Fast Facts

    • Unavailable Weekly Pay
    • 5,100 workers Employment Size
    • Decline Future Growth
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • Higher unemployment Unemployment
    • 46.9% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 38.8 hours Average full-time
    • 49 years Average age
    • 68.8% female Gender Share

    The number of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
    from 5,100 in 2018 to 4,700 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 3,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 600 a year).

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
    • Location: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages work in many regions of Australia. Many work in New South Wales or Victoria.
    • Industries: Most work in the Education and Training industry.
    • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (46.9%, fewer than the all jobs average of 68.4%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 38.8 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 49 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (59.1%).
    • Gender: 68.8% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    20085700
    20095400
    20106000
    20114800
    20126600
    20135600
    20143000
    20153000
    20165900
    20176700
    20185100
    20234700

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Education and Training97.9
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services2.1

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateTeachers of English to Speakers of Other LanguagesAll Jobs Average
    NSW45.531.6
    VIC36.326.2
    QLD5.719.7
    SA2.26.7
    WA8.110.8
    TAS0.02.0
    NT1.01.1
    ACT1.21.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketTeachers of English to Speakers of Other LanguagesAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.0-5.25.2
    20-246.9-9.99.9
    25-3424.4-23.623.6
    35-449.6-21.721.7
    45-5426.7-20.820.8
    55-5915.4-8.88.8
    60-6411.8-6.06.0
    65 and Over5.2-4.04.0

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationTeachers of English to Speakers of Other LanguagesAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate100-8.68.6
    Bachelor degree0-17.917.9
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma0-10.110.1
    Certificate III/IV0-18.918.9
    Year 120-18.718.7
    Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
    Below Year 100-8.18.1

    A Bachelor Degree or higher is usually needed to work in this job. Nearly all workers have a university degree. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Training and Education and Community Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages who can communicate clearly with people from diverse backgrounds, are caring and empathetic and can work well in a team.

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. English Language

      93% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    2. Education and Training

      90% Important

      Teaching and course design.

    3. Customer and Personal Service

      71% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    4. Psychology

      66% Important

      Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

    5. Mathematics

      63% Important

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 25-3011.00 - Adult Basic and Secondary Education and Literacy Teachers and Instructors.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

    1. Training and Teaching Others

      95% Important

      Identifying the educational needs of others, developing training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

    2. Interpreting Information for Others

      81% Important

      Helping people to understand and use information.

    3. Getting Information

      80% Important

      Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

    4. Coaching and Developing Others

      79% Important

      Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or helping others to improve.

    5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

      79% Important

      Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 25-3011.00 - Adult Basic and Secondary Education and Literacy Teachers and Instructors.

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