Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians perform technical functions to assist Construction Managers, Architects and Surveyors by supervising and inspecting construction sites, estimating time, costs and resources, inspecting plumbing work, and collecting and evaluating survey data and preparing maps and plans.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Around three in five workers have a Certificate III or higher Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Tasks

  • assisting Construction Managers, Architects and Surveyors in planning and organisation
  • interpreting plans, regulations and codes of practice
  • preparing preliminary sketches, working drawings and specifications
  • preparing, editing and revising plans, maps, charts and drawings
  • coordinating works programs
  • inspecting work and materials for compliance with specifications, regulations and standards
  • calculating costs and estimating time scales
  • collecting data using surveying instruments and photogrammetric equipment
  • performing routine computations and plotting preliminary data

Job Titles

  • Architectural Draftsperson
  • Building Associate
  • Building Inspector, Certifier or Surveyor
  • Construction or Building Estimator
  • Plumbing Inspector
  • Surveying or Spatial Science Technician
  • Other Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians
  • Architectural Draftsperson (also called Architectural Associate)

    Completes Architects' concepts by preparing drawings and plans, and liaising with builders and contractors.

    Specialisations: Building Drafting Officer

  • Building Associate

    Supervises construction sites, and organises and coordinates the material and human resources required. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Building Construction Supervisor, Clerk of Works

  • Building Inspector, Certifier or Surveyor

    Inspects buildings to ensure compliance with laws and regulations and advises on building requirements. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Electrical Installation Inspector

  • Construction or Building Estimator

    Prepares and delivers estimates and cost plans for construction projects up to the tender settlement stage.

  • Plumbing Inspector

    Inspects plumbing work to ensure compliance with relevant standards and regulations. Registration or licensing is required.

    Specialisations: Drainage Inspector, Gas Plumbing Inspector, Sanitary Plumbing and Water Supply Inspector

  • Surveying or Spatial Science Technician (also called GIS Technician)

    Collects, records and evaluates spatial information and prepares databases, maps, charts and plans in support of Surveyors, Cartographers or Other Spatial Scientists. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Aerial Survey Technician, Photogrammetrist

  • Other Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians

    Includes Roof Truss Detailer, Structural Steel Detailer

Fast Facts

  • $1,400 Weekly Pay
  • 65,700 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 93.3% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 42.4 hours Average full-time
  • 39 years Average age
  • 9.7% female Gender Share

The number of Architectural, Building & Surveying Technicians grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
from 65,700 in 2018 to 66,800 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 22,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 4,400 a year).

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Architectural, Building & Surveying Technicians work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Construction; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,400 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (93.3%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 39 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 9.7% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
200854500
200953200
201055800
201152500
201261900
201353100
201456900
201556800
201662200
201770200
201865700
202366800

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsArchitectural, Building and Surveying TechniciansAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14001230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Construction58.9
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services24.0
Manufacturing3.9
Public Administration and Safety3.3
Other Industries9.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateArchitectural, Building and Surveying TechniciansAll Jobs Average
NSW28.231.6
VIC30.426.2
QLD20.719.7
SA4.66.7
WA11.410.8
TAS2.32.0
NT1.41.1
ACT1.11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketArchitectural, Building and Surveying TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.3-5.25.2
20-244.1-9.99.9
25-3430.5-23.623.6
35-4431.8-21.721.7
45-5419.1-20.820.8
55-597.4-8.88.8
60-644.0-6.06.0
65 and Over2.7-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationArchitectural, Building and Surveying TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.7-8.68.6
Bachelor degree10.5-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma27.4-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV40.8-18.918.9
Year 127-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1011.5-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed.
Around three in five workers have a Certificate III or higher Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Construction, Plumbing and Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Architectural, Building & Surveying Technicians who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Production and Processing

    79% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  2. Building and Construction

    78% Important

    Materials, methods, and the tools used to construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    77% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Administration and Management

    76% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    74% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-1011.00 - First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Getting Information

    86% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    82% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  3. Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others

    82% Important

    Getting a group of people to work together to finish a task.

  4. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    81% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  5. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    81% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 47-1011.00 - First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers.

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