Electronic Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians assist in electronic engineering research, design, manufacture, assembly, construction, operation and maintenance of equipment, facilities and distribution systems.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Tasks

  • preparing drawings, plans and diagrams for electronic engineering work
  • developing, constructing and testing electronic equipment and associated circuitry in accordance with technical manuals and instructions of Electronics Engineers and Engineering Technologists
  • performing tests, graphing results, preparing charts and tabulations
  • estimating material costs and quantities
  • evaluating performance of equipment
  • inspecting designs and finished products for compliance with specifications, drawings, contracts and regulations
  • installing, testing, repairing and modifying electronic equipment

Job Titles

  • Electronic Engineering Draftsperson
  • Electronic Engineering Technician
  • Electronic Engineering Draftsperson

    Prepares detailed drawings and plans of electronic engineering work in support of Electronics Engineers and Engineering Technologists. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Communications and Data Systems Drafting Officer, Control Systems Drafting Officer, Electronics Detail Draftsperson

  • Electronic Engineering Technician

    Conducts tests of electronic systems, collects and analyses data, and assembles circuitry in support of Electronics Engineers and Engineering Technologists. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Aircraft Electronics Technical Officer, Communications Engineering Technical Officer, Communications Engineering Technician, Digital Controls Technical Officer, Flight Surveyor, Printed Circuit Board Designer, Process Control Technician, Telemetry Technician

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 3,800 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 82.7% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 37.4 hours Average full-time
  • 40 years Average age
  • 11.2% female Gender Share

The number of Electronic Engineering Draftspersons, Technicians fell over the past 5 years and is expected to stay fairly stable over the next 5 years:
from 3,800 in 2017 to 3,800 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 1,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Electronic Engineering Draftspersons, Technicians work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: They work in many industries such as Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Information Media and Telecommunications; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (82.7%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 37.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 40 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 11.2% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200710000
20086600
20096900
20104000
20113000
20127100
20135700
20144200
20154900
20165500
20173800
20223800

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services19.3
Information Media and Telecommunications15.0
Manufacturing14.3
Transport, Postal and Warehousing9.7
Other Industries41.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateElectronic Engineering Draftspersons, TechniciansAll Jobs Average
NSW34.031.6
VIC23.426.2
QLD16.919.7
SA1.06.7
WA17.710.8
TAS0.82.0
NT2.01.1
ACT4.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketElectronic Engineering Draftspersons, TechniciansAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.4-5.25.2
20-245.6-9.99.9
25-3424.2-23.623.6
35-4430.5-21.721.7
45-5417.6-20.820.8
55-5911.6-8.88.8
60-646.2-6.06.0
65 and Over1.7-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may also be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Electrotechnology, Transmission & Distribution, Electricity Supply Industry - Generation Sector and Metal and Engineering VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Electronic Engineering Draftspersons, Technicians who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Engineering and Technology

    87% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  2. Computers and Electronics

    82% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  3. Design

    66% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  4. Customer and Personal Service

    66% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Mechanical

    64% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-3023.01 - Electronics Engineering Technicians.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment

    85% Important

    Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing electronic machines, devices, and equipment.

  2. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    81% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  3. Interacting With Computers

    78% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  4. Getting Information

    78% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    78% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-3023.01 - Electronics Engineering Technicians.

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