Telecommunications Technical Specialists develop, monitor and carry out technical support functions for telecommunications networks and install computer equipment, computer systems and microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Sometimes relevant vendor certifications may also be required. Around three in five workers have a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed.

Tasks

  • installing, maintaining, repairing and diagnosing malfunctions of microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems
  • configuring and integrating network and telecommunications technology with computer software, hardware, desktops, peripherals, databases and operating systems
  • developing and recording logs of the details, locations and status of inventories, parts, equipment and instruments and maintaining the documentation of communication policies, procedures, guidelines and regulations, and quality standards
  • providing technical advice and information, and monitoring the performance of complex telecommunications networks and equipment
  • planning the development of customer access telecommunications network infrastructure
  • liaising with vendors, suppliers, service providers and external resources and monitoring contractual obligations and performance delivery
  • providing ongoing operational support in designing, optimising, troubleshooting, diagnosing, repairing and resolving of telecommunications network performance malfunctions, defects and faults

Job Titles

  • Radiocommunications Technician
  • Telecommunications Field Engineer
  • Telecommunications Network Planner
  • Telecommunications Technical Officer, or Technologist
  • Radiocommunications Technician

    Installs, maintains, repairs and diagnoses malfunctions of microwave, telemetry, multiplexing, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic wave communication systems.

  • Telecommunications Field Engineer

    Plans, designs, commissions and monitors complex telecommunications networks and associated equipment, provides technical advice and information, and identifies complex problems and initiates action to resolve them.

  • Telecommunications Network Planner

    Plans the development of customer access telecommunications network infrastructure.

  • Telecommunications Technical Officer, or Technologist

    Carries out specialised design and support functions in telecommunications engineering including optimisation and performance monitoring of telecommunications networks, diagnosis and repair of faults, and the selection and installation of equipment.

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 5,000 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 97.5% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 35.2 hours Average full-time
  • 40.5 years Average age
  • 20.3% female Gender Share

The number of Telecommunications Technical Specialists stayed fairly stable over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 5,000 in 2017 to 5,400 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 4,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created (a large number for an occupation of this size).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Telecommunications Technical Specialists work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Information Media and Telecommunications; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (97.5%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 35.2 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 20.3% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20073600
20085500
20095200
20104800
20116100
20125100
20134000
20144100
20153300
20165300
20175000
20225400

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Information Media and Telecommunications51.0
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services18.3
Public Administration and Safety7.6
Other Services7.2
Other Industries15.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateTelecommunications Technical SpecialistsAll Jobs Average
NSW30.031.6
VIC35.026.2
QLD14.119.7
SA13.06.7
WA1.810.8
TAS0.02.0
NT2.81.1
ACT3.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketTelecommunications Technical SpecialistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-3430.8-23.623.6
35-4433.1-21.721.7
45-5418.7-20.820.8
55-5911.8-8.88.8
60-645.6-6.06.0
65 and Over0.0-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

An Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is usually needed. Sometimes relevant vendor certifications may also be required.
Around three in five workers have a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Transmission & Distribution VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Telecommunications Technical Specialists who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Telecommunications

    93% Important

    Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

  2. Computers and Electronics

    83% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    82% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Mechanical

    71% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    68% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-2022.00 - Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    85% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

  2. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    85% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  3. Documenting/Recording Information

    83% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  4. Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment

    82% Important

    Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing electronic machines, devices, and equipment.

  5. Getting Information

    81% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-2022.00 - Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers.

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