Electrical Distribution Trades Workers prepare, install, repair, maintain and patrol electric power distribution networks.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. The majority of workers have a Certificate III/IV. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • installing conductors and aerial equipment, and underground cables and equipment
  • installing and maintaining equipment associated with electrical supply such as transformers
  • attending to electrical breakdown and emergencies
  • maintaining poles and associated hardware, and continuity of electrical supply and street lighting
  • conducting routine maintenance on the aerial and underground electricity supply network
  • conducting low-voltage switching operations
  • fitting pole hardware and crossarms
  • preparing lowand high-voltage cable joints and cable terminations while connecting and installing electrical equipment and overhead lines
  • using heavy plant equipment such as elevated work platforms and portable equipment such as hydraulic drills
  • may undertake substation installation and maintenance, and specialised testing and revenue meter installation

Job Titles

  • Electrical Linesworker
  • Technical Cable Jointer
  • Electrical Linesworker

    Installs, maintains, repairs and patrols electrical sub-transmission and distribution systems. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Electrical Linesworker (Distribution) , Electrical Linesworker (Transmission) , Railway Traction Line Worker

  • Technical Cable Jointer

    Joins insulated electric power cables installed in underground conduits and trenches, and prepares cable terminations for connection to electrical equipment and overhead lines. Registration or licensing may be required.

Fast Facts

  • $1,455 Weekly Pay
  • 7,800 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 100.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 36.7 hours Average full-time
  • 36 years Average age
  • 0.0% female Gender Share

The number of Electrical Distribution Trades Workers fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 7,800 in 2017 to 7,400 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 4,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Electrical Distribution Trades Workers work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services; Construction; and Transport, Postal and Warehousing.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,455 per week (higher than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Almost all work full-time (100%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%), part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 36.7 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 36 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 0% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20079200
20086700
200910200
201012600
20118200
201210200
201311400
201411500
20159800
20166900
20177800
20227400

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsElectrical Distribution Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings14551230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services50.7
Construction36.7
Transport, Postal and Warehousing9.4
Manufacturing2.0
Other Industries1.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateElectrical Distribution Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW36.531.6
VIC35.626.2
QLD6.819.7
SA4.16.7
WA11.010.8
TAS3.82.0
NT1.81.1
ACT0.31.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketElectrical Distribution Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-2416.2-9.99.9
25-3433.0-23.623.6
35-4416.5-21.721.7
45-5415.2-20.820.8
55-598.5-8.88.8
60-649.4-6.06.0
65 and Over1.3-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationElectrical Distribution Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree0-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma35.9-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV64.1-18.918.9
Year 120-18.718.7
Years 11 & 100-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. The majority of workers have a Certificate III/IV. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Transmission & Distribution VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Electrical Distribution Trades Workers who provide good customer service, are polite and courteous and a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    69% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    67% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Physics

    60% Important

    Physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

  4. English Language

    57% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Mathematics

    57% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-9051.00 - Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    96% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  2. Getting Information

    91% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    91% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  4. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    91% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  5. Controlling Machines and Processes

    90% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-9051.00 - Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers.

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