Jewellers make and repair jewellery such as rings, brooches, chains and bracelets, craft objects out of precious metals, and cut, shape and polish rough gemstones to produce fashion and industrial jewels.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Creativity may also be important.

Tasks

  • examining designs and specifications for jewellery and precious metal objects
  • shaping moulded metal by cutting, filing, beating, turning and bending, using specialised hand and power tools
  • assembling articles by soldering, screwing, riveting and otherwise joining
  • securing precious stones in retaining prongs and ridges, and smoothing and checking final settings
  • engraving designs on ring settings, brooches, bracelets and other articles
  • repairing jewellery by soldering, replacing and rebuilding worn and broken parts
  • appraising the quality and value of jewellery
  • cutting and dividing stones to approximate final shape, using precision hand and power tools and jigs
  • securing stones and shapes, cutting angles, smoothing and polishing
  • finishing articles using files, emery paper and buffing machines
  • restyling old jewellery

Job Titles

  • Jeweller
  • Jeweller

    Specialisations: Diamond Cutter, Faceter, Gem Setter, Goldsmith, Lapidary, Opal Polisher, Ring Maker, Silversmith

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 4,400 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 72.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • Unavailable Average full-time
  • 43 years Average age
  • 47.5% female Gender Share

The number of Jewellers fell over the past 5 years and is expected to stay fairly stable over the next 5 years:
from 4,400 in 2017 to 4,400 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 2,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Jewellers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in New South Wales.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Retail Trade; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (72%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Age: The average age is 43 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 47.5% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20075600
20085400
20095400
20104200
20116300
20124700
20133500
20144800
20153800
20164800
20174400
20224400

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing44.4
Retail Trade39.7
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services6.7
Wholesale Trade5.1
Other Industries4.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateJewellersAll Jobs Average
NSW50.731.6
VIC25.326.2
QLD11.319.7
SA3.56.7
WA7.710.8
TAS0.02.0
NT0.71.1
ACT0.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketJewellersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.3-5.25.2
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-3423.1-23.623.6
35-4432.7-21.721.7
45-547.6-20.820.8
55-596.4-8.88.8
60-6422.0-6.06.0
65 and Over7.9-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Creativity may also be important.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Metal and Engineering VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Jewellers who provide good customer service and have strong interpersonal skills.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    82% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Design

    76% Important

    Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

  3. Production and Processing

    72% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  4. Sales and Marketing

    65% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  5. Mechanical

    59% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9071.01 - Jewelers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Thinking Creatively

    86% Important

    Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

  2. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work

    76% Important

    Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done.

  3. Getting Information

    73% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Estimating Products, Events, or Information

    72% Important

    Working out sizes, distances, and amounts; or time, costs, resources, or materials needed for a task.

  5. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    72% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9071.01 - Jewelers.

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