Other Technicians and Trades Workers includes a wide variety of occupations such as Divers, Interior Decorators, Optical Dispensers, Optical Mechanics, Photographer's Assistants, Plastics Technicians, Wool Classers and Fire Protection Equipment Technicians.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required. Interior Decorators usually need an Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma.

Tasks

  • swims underwater to undertake tasks such as seafood gathering, research, salvage and construction
  • plans the interior design of commercial or residential premises and arranges for decorating work to be done
  • interprets optical prescriptions, and fits and services optical appliances such as spectacle frames and lenses
  • operates machines to grind, polish and surface optical lenses to meet prescription requirements, and fits lenses to spectacle frames
  • assists photographers in taking and developing photographs
  • sets up, adjusts, repairs and troubleshoots machines which manufacture plastics products
  • classifies wool to industry standards or market requirements

Job Titles

  • Diver
  • Interior Decorator
  • Optical Dispenser
  • Optical Mechanic
  • Photographer's Assistant
  • Plastics Technician or Fitter
  • Wool Classer
  • Fire Protection Equipment Technician
  • Other Technicians and Trades Workers
  • Diver

    Swims underwater to undertake tasks such as seafood gathering, research, salvage and construction. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Abalone Diver, Clearance Diver (Navy), Fisheries Diver, Hyperbaric Welder Diver, Offshore Diver, Onshore Diver, Pearl Diver, Saturation Diver, Scientific Diver

  • Interior Decorator

    Plans the interior design of commercial or residential premises and arranges for decorating work to be done.

  • Optical Dispenser

    Interprets optical prescriptions, and fits and services optical appliances such as spectacle frames and lenses. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Optical Mechanic

    Operates machines to grind, polish and surface optical lenses to meet prescription requirements, and fits lenses to spectacle frames.

  • Photographer's Assistant

    Assists Photographers in taking and developing photographs.

  • Plastics Technician or Fitter

    Sets up, adjusts, repairs and troubleshoots machines which manufacture plastics products.

  • Wool Classer

    Classifies wool to industry standards or market requirements.

  • Fire Protection Equipment Technician

    Installs, tests and maintains fire protection equipment and systems such as extinguishers, hoses, reels, hydrants, fire blankets, exit lighting, fire and smoke doors, gaseous fire suppression systems, passive fire and smoke containment systems and foam generating equipment. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Fire Extinguisher Technician

  • Other Technicians and Trades Workers

    Includes Airborne Electronics Analyst (Air Force), Architectural Model Maker, Canoe Maker, Coffee Machine Technician, Fibre Composite Technician, Glass Blower, Hide and Skin Classer, Irrigation Designer, Kayak Maker, Milking Machine Technician, Parachute Rigger, Pearl Technician, Pyrotechnician, Ski Technician, Surfboard Maker

Fast Facts

  • $1,135 Weekly Pay
  • 16,100 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 71.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 37.4 hours Average full-time
  • 43 years Average age
  • 46.7% female Gender Share

The number of Other Technicians and Trades Workers fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 16,100 in 2017 to 15,300 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 8,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Other Technicians and Trades Workers work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Health Care and Social Assistance; Construction; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,135 per week (similar to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (71%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 37.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 43 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 46.7% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200712900
200811900
200917300
201013900
201112800
201217100
201314800
201414900
201519800
201616800
201716100
202215300

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Technicians and Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings11351230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance32.7
Construction12.9
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services9.0
Other Services8.3
Other Industries37.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Technicians and Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW26.031.6
VIC24.726.2
QLD25.719.7
SA4.86.7
WA12.910.8
TAS3.12.0
NT1.51.1
ACT1.51.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Technicians and Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.4-5.25.2
20-249.6-9.99.9
25-3419.7-23.623.6
35-4423.9-21.721.7
45-5428.6-20.820.8
55-596.5-8.88.8
60-644.0-6.06.0
65 and Over5.3-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationOther Technicians and Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree0-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma11.3-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV24.5-18.918.9
Year 1241.7-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1022.5-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Sometimes experience or on-the-job training is needed in addition to a qualification. Registration or licensing may be required. Interior Decorators usually need an Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Health Industry, Plastics, Rubber & Cablemaking and Property Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Other Technicians and Trades Workers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    95% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Sales and Marketing

    77% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  3. Mathematics

    76% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  4. English Language

    71% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Administration and Management

    65% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 29-2081.00 - Opticians, Dispensing.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    94% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    84% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  3. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    83% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  4. Getting Information

    82% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Documenting/Recording Information

    81% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 29-2081.00 - Opticians, Dispensing.

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