Security Officers and Guards provide security and investigative services to organisations and individuals.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Security Consultants usually need a Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience. Crowd Controllers and Private Investigators usually need a Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • patrolling property and checking doors, windows and gates for unauthorised entry
  • watching for irregularities such as fire hazards, malfunctions of machines and equipment, lights left on, leaking water pipes and unlocked security doors
  • issuing security passes to authorised visitors and giving directions
  • monitoring alarms and contacting supervisors, police and fire brigades by radio or phone if security is breached or fire is detected
  • picking up and ensuring the safe delivery of cash, payrolls and valuables
  • operating coin and currency counting machines, and carrying out cash counting and packaging functions
  • maintaining order at venues where there are large gatherings of people
  • conducting investigations for clients and preparing evidence for court proceedings
  • detecting and investigating theft and other unlawful acts carried out in retail establishments
  • advising clients on security requirements and designing security specifications

Job Titles

  • Alarm, Security or Surveillance Monitor
  • Armoured Car Escort
  • Crowd Controller or Bouncer
  • Private Investigator
  • Retail Loss Prevention Officer
  • Security Consultant
  • Security Officer, or Security Guard
  • Other Security Officers and Guards
  • Alarm, Security or Surveillance Monitor

    Monitors security alarms, CCTV and other surveillance equipment, and contacts supervisors, police or fire brigades if security is breached or fire is detected. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Armoured Car Escort

    Provides armed escort for transportation and delivery of cash and other valuables. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Crowd Controller or Bouncer

    Carries out crowd control duties at entertainment, sporting or recreational venues. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Private Investigator (also called Private Inquiry Agent)

    Conducts investigations for clients and prepares evidence for court proceedings. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Retail Loss Prevention Officer

    Detects and investigates shoplifting, fraud and other unlawful acts of employees or customers of a retail establishment. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Security Consultant

    Advises clients on security requirements, and recommends and designs security specifications. Registration or licensing may be required.

  • Security Officer, or Security Guard

    Patrols and guards industrial and commercial property, railway yards, stations and other facilities. Registration or licensing may be required.

    Specialisations: Mobile Patrol Officer, Railway Patrol Officer

  • Other Security Officers and Guards

    Includes Bodyguard. Registration or licensing may be required.

Fast Facts

  • $1,177 Weekly Pay
  • 54,400 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 70.6% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 39.2 hours Average full-time
  • 40.5 years Average age
  • 17.2% female Gender Share

The number of Security Officers and Guards stayed fairly stable over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 54,400 in 2017 to 58,500 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 36,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Security Officers and Guards work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Public Administration and Safety; Transport, Postal and Warehousing; and Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,177 per week (similar to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (70.6%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 39.2 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 17.2% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200751800
200847600
200948600
201048600
201153800
201255400
201353900
201454200
201552900
201648300
201754400
202258500

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsSecurity Officers and GuardsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings11771230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Public Administration and Safety70.6
Transport, Postal and Warehousing4.4
Health Care and Social Assistance3.8
Accommodation and Food Services3.5
Other Industries17.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateSecurity Officers and GuardsAll Jobs Average
NSW25.131.6
VIC24.726.2
QLD23.519.7
SA6.26.7
WA12.410.8
TAS1.72.0
NT2.61.1
ACT3.91.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketSecurity Officers and GuardsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-191.6-5.25.2
20-2412.9-9.99.9
25-3420.5-23.623.6
35-4420.9-21.721.7
45-5420.6-20.820.8
55-5910.5-8.88.8
60-648.4-6.06.0
65 and Over4.5-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationSecurity Officers and GuardsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate7.8-8.68.6
Bachelor degree10-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma9.4-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV33-18.918.9
Year 1219.5-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1017.2-17.717.7
Below Year 103.1-8.18.1

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Security Consultants usually need a Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience. Crowd Controllers and Private Investigators usually need a Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Property Services and Public Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Security Officers and Guards who can connect with others, are trustworthy, responsible and reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Public Safety and Security

    78% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

  2. English Language

    68% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    63% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Psychology

    58% Important

    Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

  5. Education and Training

    55% Important

    Teaching and course design.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 33-9032.00 - Security Guards.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Getting Information

    91% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    90% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  3. Documenting/Recording Information

    89% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  4. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    88% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

  5. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    87% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 33-9032.00 - Security Guards.

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