Outdoor Adventure Guides direct, instruct and guide individuals and groups in outdoor adventure activities such as bungy jumping, fishing and hunting, mountaineering, trekking and whitewater rafting.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed. Even with a qualification, further experience or on-the-job training is sometimes needed.

Tasks

  • meeting members of a tour on arrival and making introductions
  • organising and supervising groups involved in outdoor adventures such as bungy jumping, fishing and hunting, mountaineering, trekking and whitewater rafting
  • setting up and maintaining equipment, and ensuring that equipment is safe and in working condition
  • demonstrating and providing instruction in the use of equipment and techniques required for participation
  • providing advice on safety measures, and ensuring that activities are conducted in a manner to minimise risk to participants
  • responding to emergencies by providing first aid assistance and taking appropriate further action if required
  • answering questions and advising on local interest points within a specific region
  • may maintain written reports of daily activities and carry out other administrative work

Job Titles

  • Bungy Jump Master
  • Fishing Guide
  • Hunting Guide
  • Mountain or Glacier Guide
  • Outdoor Adventure Instructor
  • Trekking or Bushwalking Guide
  • Whitewater Rafting Guide
  • Other Outdoor Adventure Guides
  • Bungy Jump Master

    Directs, supervises and controls bungy jumping activities for individuals.

  • Fishing Guide

    Plans, organises and provides guided fishing trips for individuals or groups.

    Specialisations: Fly Fishing Guide, Ocean Fishing Guide

  • Hunting Guide

    Plans, organises and provides guided hunting trips for individuals or groups.

  • Mountain or Glacier Guide

    Plans, organises and provides guided trips for individuals or groups on mountains or glaciers.

    Specialisations: Climbing Guide, Ski Guide

  • Outdoor Adventure Instructor (also called Outdoor Adventure Leader)

    Provides adventure-based experiential education in outdoor adventure and bushcraft.

    Specialisations: Abseiling Instructor, Adventure Challenge Instructor, Hang-gliding Instructor, Outdoor Education Teacher, Outdoor Pursuits Instructor, Paragliding Instructor, Rock Climbing Instructor

  • Trekking or Bushwalking Guide

    Plans, organises and provides guided bushwalking and trekking trips for individuals or groups.

  • Whitewater Rafting Guide

    Plans, organises and provides guided rafting and kayaking trips for individuals or groups on whitewater rivers.

  • Other Outdoor Adventure Guides

    Includes Caving Guide, Cycle Touring Guide, Horse Trekking Guide, Sea Kayaking Guide, Skydiving Instructor

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 2,800 workers Employment Size
  • Very strong Future Growth
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 39.7% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 42.7 hours Average full-time
  • 31 years Average age
  • 36.4% female Gender Share

The number of Outdoor Adventure Guides fell over the past 5 years and is expected to grow very strongly over the next 5 years:
from 2,800 in 2017 to 3,500 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 2,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Outdoor Adventure Guides work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Education and Training; Arts and Recreation Services; and Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (39.7%, fewer than the all jobs average of 68.4%), showing there are many opportunites to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42.7 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 31 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (48.7%).
  • Gender: 36.4% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20071200
2008700
20091300
20101500
20111800
20123300
20131300
20141400
20154000
20162200
20172800
20223500

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Education and Training50.5
Arts and Recreation Services22.3
Health Care and Social Assistance10.5
Transport, Postal and Warehousing7.7
Other Industries9.0

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOutdoor Adventure GuidesAll Jobs Average
NSW38.731.6
VIC27.226.2
QLD10.019.7
SA9.36.7
WA8.910.8
TAS4.22.0
NT1.71.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOutdoor Adventure GuidesAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-1910.8-5.25.2
20-2437.9-9.99.9
25-3410.3-23.623.6
35-4411.2-21.721.7
45-5422.9-20.820.8
55-594.0-8.88.8
60-642.9-6.06.0
65 and Over0.0-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed. Even with a qualification, further experience or on-the-job training is sometimes needed.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Sport, Fitness and Recreation VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Outdoor Adventure Guides who interact well with others, provide good customer service and are physically fit.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    81% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Education and Training

    76% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  3. Psychology

    71% Important

    Human behaviour and performance; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioural and affective disorders.

  4. English Language

    70% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Biology

    56% Important

    Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-9031.00 - Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Performing General Physical Activities

    90% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  2. Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge

    84% Important

    Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas.

  3. Building Good Relationships

    80% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  4. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    77% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  5. Handling and Moving Objects

    76% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-9031.00 - Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors.

go to top