Mail Sorters receive, sort and despatch mail in organisations and postal sorting centres.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary. Around one third of workers have Year 11 and 10 as their highest level of education.

Tasks

  • receiving and checking incoming mail and mail bags
  • assisting with the verification of registered and special articles
  • operating mail processing equipment such as letter preparation lines, letter indexing and sorting equipment
  • performing manual sorting duties and preparing documentation for despatching mail
  • processing underpaid mail, bulk mail lodgements, express mail and other mail services
  • operating letter indexing and sorting machines, multi-line optical character machines and bar-coding equipment
  • investigating complaints regarding lost items

Job Titles

  • Mail Clerk, or Mail Officer
  • Postal Sorting Officer
  • Mail Clerk, or Mail Officer

    Collects, sorts and despatches mail within an organisation.

  • Postal Sorting Officer

    Receives, sorts and despatches mail in a post office or postal sorting centre.

    Specialisations: Parcel Post Officer

Fast Facts

  • $1,001 Weekly Pay
  • 10,400 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 61.7% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 37.2 hours Average full-time
  • 49 years Average age
  • 56.8% female Gender Share

The number of Mail Sorters fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 10,400 in 2017 to 9,000 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 4,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Mail Sorters work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Manufacturing; and Information Media and Telecommunications.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,001 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (61.7%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 37.2 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 49 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (58.2%).
  • Gender: 56.8% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200719300
200815000
200914300
201014000
201115100
201212300
201312800
201413900
201516400
201613400
201710400
20229000

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsMail SortersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings10011230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing77.0
Manufacturing7.3
Information Media and Telecommunications4.2
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services2.6
Other Industries8.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMail SortersAll Jobs Average
NSW36.231.6
VIC24.026.2
QLD7.419.7
SA13.26.7
WA12.710.8
TAS3.22.0
NT1.81.1
ACT1.51.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMail SortersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-195.2-5.25.2
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-3410.8-23.623.6
35-4425.7-21.721.7
45-5424.4-20.820.8
55-5920.5-8.88.8
60-649.8-6.06.0
65 and Over3.5-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMail SortersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree10.9-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma19.7-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV7.3-18.918.9
Year 1223.4-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1038.7-17.717.7
Below Year 100-8.18.1

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.
Around one third of workers have Year 11 and 10 as their highest level of education.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Transport and Logistics Training Package VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Mail Sorters who are efficient, reliable and have a good work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. English Language

    61% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Production and Processing

    49% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    48% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Clerical

    45% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

  5. Administration and Management

    43% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 43-5053.00 - Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Handling and Moving Objects

    76% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  2. Performing General Physical Activities

    76% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    75% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Getting Information

    70% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  5. Building Good Relationships

    66% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 43-5053.00 - Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators.

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