Insurance Investigators, Loss Adjusters and Risk Surveyors conduct investigations into insurance claims to ensure their validity, inspect and assess the damage and loss to insured properties and businesses, estimate insurance costs, and inspect insured properties to evaluate conditions affecting underwriting standards.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is required to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes additional experience or on-the-job training is needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • examining scenes of incidents resulting in insurance claims to determine causes and effects
  • interviewing witnesses and claimants to obtain details required to assess the validity of claims and identify the parties responsible for accidents, damage and loss, and preparing statements and reports
  • inspecting damaged buildings, equipment and motor vehicles and estimating the cost of repairs
  • estimating business losses resulting from fire, theft and other business disruptions
  • reporting the extent of damage and estimated costs to the insurer
  • inspecting property, buildings and operations of commercial and industrial establishments to assess physical conditions and work practices
  • evaluating the adequacy of security, fire and related systems
  • preparing reports and recommending action to reduce risks
  • compiling data which influence the determination of premium rates

Job Titles

  • Insurance Investigator
  • Insurance Loss Adjuster
  • Insurance Risk Surveyor
  • Insurance Investigator

    Conducts investigations into insurance claims to ensure their validity. Registration or licensing is required.

  • Insurance Loss Adjuster (also called Insurance Loss Assessor)

    Inspects and assesses the damage and loss to insured property and business, estimates insurance costs, and acts to minimise the cost of claims to an insurance company.

  • Insurance Risk Surveyor

    Inspects items and properties to evaluate conditions affecting underwriting standards, and develops and promotes safety programs.

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 6,800 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 94.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • Unavailable Average full-time
  • 42 years Average age
  • 38.9% female Gender Share

The number of Insurance Investigators, Loss Adjusters and Risk Surveyors grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 6,800 in 2018 to 7,000 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 6,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 1,200 a year).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Insurance Investigators, Loss Adjusters and Risk Surveyors work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: They work in many industries such as Financial and Insurance Services; Public Administration and Safety; and Retail Trade.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (94%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%) showing part-time work may be hard to find.
  • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 38.9% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20087300
20097400
20105900
20115800
20126300
20135500
20145200
20154800
20165800
20175600
20186800
20237000

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Financial and Insurance Services89.0
Public Administration and Safety5.4
Retail Trade3.6
Education and Training2.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateInsurance Investigators, Loss Adjusters and Risk SurveyorsAll Jobs Average
NSW34.531.6
VIC31.126.2
QLD14.219.7
SA10.16.7
WA6.510.8
TAS0.42.0
NT2.11.1
ACT1.11.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketInsurance Investigators, Loss Adjusters and Risk SurveyorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-249.3-9.99.9
25-3421.7-23.623.6
35-4432.2-21.721.7
45-5422.0-20.820.8
55-594.4-8.88.8
60-648.3-6.06.0
65 and Over2.1-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience is required to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes additional experience or on-the-job training is needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Financial Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Insurance Investigators, Loss Adjusters and Risk Surveyors who have good attention to detail, strong people skills and a good work ethic.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. English Language

    87% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    85% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Clerical

    66% Important

    Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

  4. Law and Government

    61% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  5. Mathematics

    60% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 13-1031.02 - Insurance Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    93% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

  2. Interacting With Computers

    91% Important

    Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

  3. Getting Information

    90% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Documenting/Recording Information

    90% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  5. Processing Information

    84% Important

    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 13-1031.02 - Insurance Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators.

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