Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons includes occupations such as Materials Recyclers and Rental Salespersons.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

Tasks

  • salvages materials from industrial, commercial and private establishments for resale
  • rents goods and equipment to individuals and businesses

Job Titles

  • Materials Recycler
  • Rental Salesperson
  • Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons
  • Materials Recycler (also called Scrap Materials Buyer)

    Salvages materials from industrial, commercial and private establishments for resale.

    Specialisations: Automotive Dismantler, Bottle Dealer, Waste Recycler

  • Rental Salesperson (also called Rental Clerk)

    Rents goods and equipment to individuals and businesses.

    Specialisations: Car Rental Sales Assistant, Industrial Hire Sales Assistant, Video Library Assistant

  • Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons

    Includes Carpet Measurer, Lotteries Agent, Swimming Pool Salesperson

Fast Facts

  • $1,095 Weekly Pay
  • 15,600 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 72.7% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41.8 hours Average full-time
  • 39 years Average age
  • 36.3% female Gender Share

The number of Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons grew moderately over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 15,600 in 2017 to 16,200 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 14,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Wholesale Trade; Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services; and Retail Trade.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,095 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (72.7%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41.8 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 39 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 36.3% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20075800
200812000
20098700
201015500
201112900
201215100
201314800
201413600
201516600
20169300
201715600
202216200

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings10951230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Wholesale Trade29.1
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services28.4
Retail Trade15.7
Transport, Postal and Warehousing4.8
Other Industries22.0

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs Average
NSW41.131.6
VIC18.826.2
QLD19.019.7
SA8.56.7
WA7.210.8
TAS3.52.0
NT0.71.1
ACT1.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketOther Sales Assistants and SalespersonsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-195.7-5.25.2
20-244.9-9.99.9
25-3427.0-23.623.6
35-4424.6-21.721.7
45-5420.6-20.820.8
55-596.4-8.88.8
60-645.5-6.06.0
65 and Over5.2-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Retail Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Sales Assistants and Sales Persons who interact well with others, provide good customer service and have an enthusiastic and positive attitude.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    86% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Sales and Marketing

    78% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  3. English Language

    67% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Mathematics

    60% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Administration and Management

    57% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-2031.00 - Retail Salespersons.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    93% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  2. Selling or Influencing Others

    91% Important

    Convincing people to buy something or to change their minds or actions.

  3. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  4. Building Good Relationships

    78% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  5. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization

    76% Important

    Communicating with customers, the public, government, and others in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-2031.00 - Retail Salespersons.

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