Visual Merchandisers plan and install internal, window and fixed displays to show goods to their best advantage.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Tasks

  • determining goods for display in accordance with prospective seasonal and promotional events
  • developing overall promotional and display plans for approval
  • preparing sketches and models showing layout, colour and other features for approval
  • obtaining props and other accessories, and building displays
  • setting up fabricated displays in store windows and other areas
  • organising the setting out of goods to be shown as part of permanent displays
  • arranging ticketing and signage
  • arranging lighting to highlight fixtures, displays and goods

Job Titles

  • Visual Merchandiser, or Window Dresser

    Fast Facts

    • Unavailable Weekly Pay
    • 8,100 workers Employment Size
    • Strong Future Growth
    • Lower skill Skill level rating
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 48.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 37.6 hours Average full-time
    • 34 years Average age
    • 85.4% female Gender Share

    The number of Visual Merchandisers grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow strongly over the next 5 years:
    from 8,100 in 2018 to 8,900 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 5,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 1,000 a year).

    • Size: This is a small occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
    • Location: Visual Merchandisers work in most regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Retail Trade; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Wholesale Trade.
    • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (48%, fewer than the all jobs average of 68.4%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 37.6 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 34 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 85.4% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    20086400
    20098300
    20108100
    20116900
    20127400
    20136500
    20145400
    20157000
    20168900
    20179100
    20188100
    20238900

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Retail Trade58.2
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services20.6
    Wholesale Trade11.4
    Manufacturing5.8
    Other Industries4.0

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateVisual MerchandisersAll Jobs Average
    NSW33.031.6
    VIC32.226.2
    QLD15.719.7
    SA5.16.7
    WA13.510.8
    TAS0.32.0
    NT0.21.1
    ACT0.01.8

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketVisual MerchandisersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191.3-5.25.2
    20-2410.9-9.99.9
    25-3442.2-23.623.6
    35-4422.1-21.721.7
    45-549.4-20.820.8
    55-591.2-8.88.8
    60-644.8-6.06.0
    65 and Over8.2-4.04.0

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Retail Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Visual Merchandisers who interact well with others, provide good customer service and who are reliable.

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      77% Important

      Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Sales and Marketing

      76% Important

      Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

    3. English Language

      66% Important

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    4. Administration and Management

      63% Important

      Planning and coordination of people and resources.

    5. Design

      57% Important

      Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-1026.00 - Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Activities

    These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

    1. Getting Information

      86% Important

      Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

    2. Thinking Creatively

      86% Important

      Using your own ideas to developing, designing, or creating something new.

    3. Performing General Physical Activities

      85% Important

      Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

    4. Handling and Moving Objects

      84% Important

      Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

    5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

      83% Important

      Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-1026.00 - Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers.

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