Photographic Developers and Printers edit and adjust digital images, develop photographic film, and print photographic images from digital media, negatives and positives using computer software, fully automatic equipment and by separate processes.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Tasks

  • cropping images and adjusting colour, brightness and contrast
  • preparing exposed film for different processing batches in dark rooms and dark chambers
  • adjusting settings and running automatic developing equipment
  • inspecting prints and adjusting settings on print-making equipment to produce required number, size and type of prints
  • scanning images onto electronic media
  • checking and replenishing chemicals and water supply for chemical and water baths required to produce negative and positive prints
  • monitoring and testing photographic processing and printing equipment, and maintaining operational standards
  • may prepare chemical solutions for different techniques and effects
  • may develop black and white images by separate processes and operate enlargers
  • may develop motion picture film

Job Titles

  • Photographic Developer and Printer
  • Photographic Developer and Printer

    Specialisations: Copy Camera Operator, Dark Room Attendant, Digital Photographic Printer, Film Process Operator, Minilab Operator, Photographic Enlarger Operator, Silver Recovery Operator, Slide Developer

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 1,700 workers Employment Size
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 50.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • Unavailable Average full-time
  • 32 years Average age
  • 65.7% female Gender Share

The number of Photographic Developers and Printers grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to stay fairly stable over the next 5 years:
from 1,700 in 2017 to 1,700 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 1,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Most work in Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland.
  • Industries: Most work in Health Care and Social Assistance; Other Services; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (90.4%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Age: The average age is 32 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 65.7% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
20073200
20083600
20093500
20101600
20112600
20121400
20131400
2014900
20151200
20161800
20171700
20221700

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Health Care and Social Assistance46.9
Other Services18.8
Manufacturing18.0
Retail Trade7.1
Other Industries9.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StatePhotographic Developers and PrintersAll Jobs Average
NSW0.031.6
VIC0.026.2
QLD26.919.7
SA25.76.7
WA35.610.8
TAS8.62.0
NT0.01.1
ACT3.21.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketPhotographic Developers and PrintersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-193.1-5.25.2
20-2411.5-9.99.9
25-3451.7-23.623.6
35-445.3-21.721.7
45-5418.8-20.820.8
55-599.5-8.88.8
60-640.0-6.06.0
65 and Over0.0-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Photographic Developers and Printers who have good attention to detail, are reliable and hardworking.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    83% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Production and Processing

    70% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  3. Computers and Electronics

    63% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  4. English Language

    61% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Chemistry

    59% Important

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change. Danger signs and disposal methods.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9151.00 - Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Controlling Machines and Processes

    76% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  2. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    75% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  3. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    73% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

  4. Building Good Relationships

    72% Important

    Building and keeping constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.

  5. Getting Information

    71% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9151.00 - Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators.

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