Delivery Drivers drive vans and cars to deliver goods.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Around one in four workers have Years 11 and 10 as their highest level of education. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary. Registration or licensing is required.

Tasks

  • determining the destinations of goods and most appropriate delivery routes
  • manoeuvring vehicles into position for loading and unloading
  • assisting with loading to ensure goods are arranged for ease of delivery and safely secured to avoid damage
  • verifying loading documents
  • arranging and performing unloading operations and obtaining certification of deliveries
  • reporting vehicle maintenance needs
  • may receive payments for deliveries and arrange accounts

Job Titles

  • Delivery Driver
  • Delivery Driver (also called Van Driver)

    Specialisations: Fast Food Delivery Driver, Grocery Deliverer, Meals on Wheels Driver, Taxi Truck Driver

Fast Facts

  • $881 Weekly Pay
  • 46,600 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 54.8% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 40.4 hours Average full-time
  • 37 years Average age
  • 9.6% female Gender Share

The number of Delivery Drivers grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow moderately over the next 5 years:
from 46,600 in 2017 to 49,100 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 25,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Delivery Drivers work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Accommodation and Food Services; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $881 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: More than half work full-time (54.8%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%), but there are many opportunites to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 40.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 37 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (26.5%).
  • Gender: 9.6% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200742900
200834200
200933600
201039100
201147000
201241300
201346500
201440500
201548500
201649400
201746600
202249100

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsDelivery DriversAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings8811230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing34.1
Accommodation and Food Services23.2
Wholesale Trade14.7
Retail Trade11.5
Other Industries16.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateDelivery DriversAll Jobs Average
NSW32.631.6
VIC20.426.2
QLD21.819.7
SA6.96.7
WA12.510.8
TAS2.52.0
NT1.51.1
ACT1.91.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketDelivery DriversAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-1912.6-5.25.2
20-2413.9-9.99.9
25-3418.8-23.623.6
35-4413.5-21.721.7
45-5419.0-20.820.8
55-599.7-8.88.8
60-648.0-6.06.0
65 and Over4.4-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationDelivery DriversAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0-8.68.6
Bachelor degree8.3-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma12.9-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV22.8-18.918.9
Year 1226.4-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1027-17.717.7
Below Year 102.6-8.18.1

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job.
Around one in four workers have Years 11 and 10 as their highest level of education. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary. Registration or licensing is required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Transport and Logistics Training Package VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Delivery Drivers who are reliable, provide good customer service and can interact well with a variety of people.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and Personal Service

    74% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Transportation

    72% Important

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  3. Law and Government

    67% Important

    How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

  4. English Language

    60% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    56% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-3033.00 - Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    84% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  2. Getting Information

    83% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  3. Handling and Moving Objects

    77% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  4. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    75% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  5. Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events

    74% Important

    Comparing objects, actions, or events, looking for differences between them or changes over time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-3033.00 - Light Truck or Delivery Services Drivers.

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