Product Assemblers put together components and subassemblies that go into the production of metal products, electrical and electronic equipment, jewellery and precious metal articles, and joinery products.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Around one in three workers have Years 11 and 10 as their highest level of education.

Tasks

  • locating, positioning and securing components on workbenches
  • punching and drilling mounting holes in parts and assembled products
  • assembling and securing components in sequence
  • assembling parts by nailing, screwing, gluing and dowelling, riveting, crimping, soldering and spot welding components
  • fitting hardware items, such as hinges, catches and knobs, to parts
  • attaching and fastening jewellery and jewellery parts to fabricate bracelets, necklaces, brooches and earrings
  • deburring and finishing items using files, grinding wheels and emery paper
  • may manually wind light electrical field coils

Job Titles

  • Product Assembler
  • Product Assembler

    Specialisations: Electrical and Electronic Assembler, Light Coil Winder, Vehicle Assembler

Fast Facts

  • $965 Weekly Pay
  • 33,800 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Entry level Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 87.0% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 37.4 hours Average full-time
  • 43 years Average age
  • 23.0% female Gender Share

The number of Product Assemblers grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 33,800 in 2018 to 35,900 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 25,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 5,000 a year).

  • Size: This is a large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Product Assemblers work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Victoria.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Construction; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $965 per week (below the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (87%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 37.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 43 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 23% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
200844500
200938900
201032700
201132800
201233600
201329800
201429800
201524700
201624800
201729300
201833800
202335900

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsProduct AssemblersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings9651230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing80.5
Construction4.1
Wholesale Trade3.7
Retail Trade3.2
Other Industries8.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateProduct AssemblersAll Jobs Average
NSW28.631.6
VIC40.726.2
QLD11.019.7
SA10.56.7
WA7.710.8
TAS0.52.0
NT0.11.1
ACT0.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketProduct AssemblersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-197.8-5.25.2
20-2412.6-9.99.9
25-3416.2-23.623.6
35-4415.7-21.721.7
45-5426.8-20.820.8
55-5913.2-8.88.8
60-645.9-6.06.0
65 and Over1.8-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, Education and Work (2016). Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Skill level requirements can change over time, the qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationProduct AssemblersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate6.1-8.68.6
Bachelor degree7.3-17.917.9
Advanced Diploma/Diploma14.2-10.110.1
Certificate III/IV13.8-18.918.9
Year 1218.2-18.718.7
Years 11 & 1030.8-17.717.7
Below Year 109.7-8.18.1

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.
Around one in three workers have Years 11 and 10 as their highest level of education.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Production Assemblers who work well in a team, can communicate clearly and are reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    78% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Production and Processing

    68% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

  3. Customer and Personal Service

    64% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Engineering and Technology

    60% Important

    Use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  5. Mathematics

    58% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-2031.00 - Engine and Other Machine Assemblers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Handling and Moving Objects

    86% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  2. Controlling Machines and Processes

    86% Important

    Operate machines or processes either directly or using controls (not including computers or vehicles).

  3. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    80% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  4. Performing General Physical Activities

    78% Important

    Doing things that use of your arms and legs and whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

  5. Getting Information

    75% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-2031.00 - Engine and Other Machine Assemblers.

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