Product Quality Controllers examine manufactured products and primary produce to ensure conformity to specifications and standards of presentation and quality.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Tasks

  • studying product specifications and taking measurements to determine conformity to specifications
  • examining and marking output for visible defects such as cracks, holes and breakages
  • making minor repairs and adjustments to products
  • compiling quality assurance reports, maintaining documentation and reporting findings
  • examining products for defects and grading produce
  • designating grading of produce and recording details of assessments according to classification system
  • collecting and labelling samples for inspection
  • recording details of sampling procedures and sources of samples
  • preparing samples and carrying out prescribed tests

Job Titles

  • Product Examiner
  • Product Grader
  • Product Tester
  • Product Examiner (also called Quality Assurance Assessor or Quality Control Assessor)

    Examines products to ensure conformity to specifications and standards of presentation and quality.

    Specialisations: Film Examiner, Metal Products Viewer, Textile Examiner, Tyre Finisher and Examiner, Vehicle Assembly Inspector

  • Product Grader

    Grades primary produce by evaluating individual items or batches against established standards and records results.

    Specialisations: Fruit and Vegetable Classer, Meat Grader, Milk and Cream Grader, Timber Grader

  • Product Tester

    Collects product samples, conducts tests to determine quality of produce and maintains records of results.

    Specialisations: Coal Sample Tester, Glassware Verifier, Iron Pellet Tester

Fast Facts

  • $1,149 Weekly Pay
  • 14,700 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • Higher unemployment Unemployment
  • 84.9% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 36.1 hours Average full-time
  • 44 years Average age
  • 49.4% female Gender Share

The number of Product Quality Controllers stayed fairly stable over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 14,700 in 2017 to 13,300 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 10,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2017.
  • Location: Product Quality Controllers work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $1,149 per week (similar to the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (84.9%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 36.1 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 44 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 49.4% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200715500
200817000
200914900
201017100
201113800
201214900
201313000
201414200
201513200
201611100
201714700
202213300

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsProduct Quality ControllersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings11491230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Manufacturing58.3
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services9.5
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing6.7
Wholesale Trade5.4
Other Industries20.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateProduct Quality ControllersAll Jobs Average
NSW37.331.6
VIC25.126.2
QLD18.919.7
SA10.36.7
WA6.310.8
TAS1.22.0
NT0.51.1
ACT0.41.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketProduct Quality ControllersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-193.3-5.25.2
20-249.6-9.99.9
25-3422.6-23.623.6
35-4416.6-21.721.7
45-5423.8-20.820.8
55-5911.1-8.88.8
60-646.7-6.06.0
65 and Over6.3-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate II or III, or at least 1 year of relevant experience, is usually needed to work in this job. Even with a qualification, sometimes experience or on-the-job training is necessary.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Product Quality Controllers who pay attention to detail, can communicate clearly and work well in a team.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Chemistry

    80% Important

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change. Danger signs and disposal methods.

  2. Mathematics

    72% Important

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. English Language

    71% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Computers and Electronics

    68% Important

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Production and Processing

    65% Important

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-4099.01 - Quality Control Analysts.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Getting Information

    86% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Documenting/Recording Information

    85% Important

    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

  3. Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings

    81% Important

    Checking objects, actions, or events, keeping an eye out for problems.

  4. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    80% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

  5. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    79% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-4099.01 - Quality Control Analysts.

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