Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters fit and replace parts and accessories on motor vehicles.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job. Around one in three workers have a Certificate III/IV.

Tasks

  • removing old and damaged parts and cleaning surrounding areas on vehicles
  • fitting batteries and installing accessories such as sun roofs, stereos and alarms
  • removing damaged glass, trimming strips and rubber seals from window frames and mountings on motor vehicles, positioning new windscreens and glass windows on frames and attaching and sealing them
  • inspecting, removing and repairing muffler mountings, and fitting new mufflers, extractors and exhaust pipes
  • removing radiators from vehicles and cleaning and repairing them
  • installing new or repaired radiators into vehicles and repairing and replacing other units in the cooling system such as thermostats, head gaskets and water pumps
  • inspecting tyres to determine which repair action to implement and repairing punctures in tubes and tubeless tyres
  • operating air driven equipment to remove and refit tyres and tubes on vehicles
  • balancing wheels and tyres using static and electronic equipment

Job Titles

  • Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitter (General)
  • Autoglazier, or Windscreen Fitter
  • Exhaust and Muffler Repairer or Fitter
  • Radiator Repairer or Fitter
  • Tyre Fitter
  • Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitter (General)

    Fits and replaces parts and accessories on motor vehicles.

  • Autoglazier, or Windscreen Fitter

    Repairs and replaces windscreens and side and rear glass in motor vehicles.

    Specialisations: Vehicle Window Tinter

  • Exhaust and Muffler Repairer or Fitter

    Repairs and replaces defective exhaust and muffler systems in motor vehicles.

  • Radiator Repairer or Fitter

    Repairs and replaces radiators and cooling systems in motor vehicles.

  • Tyre Fitter

    Fits, repairs and replaces tyres on motor vehicles.

Fast Facts

  • $881 Weekly Pay
  • 14,500 workers Employment Size
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 88.2% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 38.4 hours Average full-time
  • 36.5 years Average age
  • 1.1% female Gender Share

The number of Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 14,500 in 2017 to 12,900 by 2022.
There are likely to be around 10,000 job openings over this time from workers leaving and new jobs being created.

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2017.
  • Location: Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters work in many regions of Australia. Many work in Queensland.
  • Industries: Most work in Other Services; Retail Trade; and Manufacturing.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers earn around $881 per week (lower than the all jobs average of $1,230). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (88.2%, much higher than the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 38.4 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 37 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 1.1% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2017 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2022.
YearNumber of Workers
200711100
200811400
200910400
201013300
201116700
201216400
201313100
201414500
201511500
201611700
201714500
202212900

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Characteristics of Employment survey, August 2015, Cat. No. 6333.0, Customised Report. Median earnings are before tax and do not include superannuation. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsMotor Vehicle Parts and Accessories FittersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings8811230

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Other Services45.9
Retail Trade37.3
Manufacturing5.3
Construction4.9
Other Industries6.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMotor Vehicle Parts and Accessories FittersAll Jobs Average
NSW15.831.6
VIC23.126.2
QLD34.519.7
SA8.56.7
WA13.910.8
TAS1.72.0
NT2.51.1
ACT0.01.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMotor Vehicle Parts and Accessories FittersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-194.1-5.25.2
20-2414.8-9.99.9
25-3428.5-23.623.6
35-4422.6-21.721.7
45-5418.6-20.820.8
55-592.8-8.88.8
60-647.6-6.06.0
65 and Over0.9-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Year 10 Certificate, Certificate I, or a short period of on-the-job training is sometimes needed, but is not necessary to work in this job.
Around one in three workers have a Certificate III/IV.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Automotive Retail, Service and Repair and Automotive Manufacturing Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters who are reliable, can interact with others, and are well presented.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    80% Important

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    72% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Administration and Management

    64% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  4. Sales and Marketing

    60% Important

    Showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  5. English Language

    59% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-3093.00 - Tire Repairers and Changers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Getting Information

    82% Important

    Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information.

  2. Operating Vehicles or Equipment

    82% Important

    Running, manoeuvring, navigating, or driving things like forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

  3. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Staff

    79% Important

    Giving information to supervisors, co-workers, and staff by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

  4. Handling and Moving Objects

    79% Important

    Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

  5. Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material

    78% Important

    Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials for errors, problems or defects.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-3093.00 - Tire Repairers and Changers.

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