Driving Instructors instruct individuals and groups in the theory and application of driving motor vehicles.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

Tasks

  • instructing students under actual driving conditions, and explaining and demonstrating the operation of brakes, clutch, gear selection, automatic transmission, signals and lights
  • teaching road traffic regulations
  • teaching road craft and road safety
  • advising students when they are ready to undergo driving examination
  • may advise on and teach advanced driving techniques required for emergency situations
  • may illustrate and explain handling and mechanical operation of motor vehicles and driving techniques using blackboard diagrams and audiovisual aids

Job Titles

  • Driving Instructor
  • Driving Instructor

    Specialisations: Motorcycle Riding Instructor

Fast Facts

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • 5,200 workers Employment Size
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 61.9% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 45.1 hours Average full-time
  • 53 years Average age
  • 13.9% female Gender Share

The number of Driving Instructors fell over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 5,200 in 2018 to 5,500 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 3,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 600 a year).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2017.
  • Location: Driving Instructors work in most regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Education and Training; Transport, Postal and Warehousing; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (61.9%, similar to the all jobs average of 68.4%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45.1 hours per week at work (compared to the all jobs average of 40.0 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 53 years (compared to the all jobs average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (77.5%).
  • Gender: 13.9% of workers are female (compared to the all jobs average of 46.7%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20086700
20094100
20104200
20116700
20125100
20137000
20144900
20154800
20165700
20176300
20185200
20235500

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Education and Training79.0
Transport, Postal and Warehousing6.9
Public Administration and Safety6.9
Mining4.0
Other Industries3.2

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateDriving InstructorsAll Jobs Average
NSW35.031.6
VIC12.026.2
QLD26.519.7
SA9.86.7
WA12.610.8
TAS1.32.0
NT1.11.1
ACT1.81.8

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2017, Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003: Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketDriving InstructorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.25.2
20-240.0-9.99.9
25-345.4-23.623.6
35-4417.0-21.721.7
45-5432.8-20.820.8
55-5914.8-8.88.8
60-6420.5-6.06.0
65 and Over9.4-4.04.0

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

A Certificate III including at least 2 years of on-the-job training, or a Certificate IV, or at least 3 years of relevant experience, is usually needed. Even with a qualification, experience or on-the-job training is usually needed. Registration or licensing may be required.

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Transport and Logistics Training Package VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Driving Instructors who are professional, provide good customer service and are reliable.

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Education and Training

    91% Important

    Teaching and course design.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    90% Important

    Customer and personal services. This includes understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. English Language

    78% Important

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Administration and Management

    66% Important

    Planning and coordination of people and resources.

  5. Public Safety and Security

    62% Important

    Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 25-1194.00 - Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Activities

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

  1. Training and Teaching Others

    94% Important

    Identifying the educational needs of others, developing training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

  2. Performing for or Working Directly with the Public

    91% Important

    Performing for, or speaking with, the public. This includes speaking on television, serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

  3. Coaching and Developing Others

    88% Important

    Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or helping others to improve.

  4. Guiding, Directing and Motivating Staff

    83% Important

    Guiding and directing staff, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

  5. Making Decisions and Solving Problems

    81% Important

    Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 25-1194.00 - Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary.

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