Marketing Specialists identify market opportunities and advise on the development, coordination and implementation of plans for pricing and promoting an organisation's goods and services.

Specialisations: Brand Manager, Category Manager, Product Manager, Sales Promotion Officer.

You usually need a bachelor degree in marketing, business management, communications, commerce or another related field to work as a Marketing Specialist. Training may also be available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Tasks

  • Researches potential demand and market characteristics for new goods and services and collects and analyses data and other statistical information.
  • Supports business growth and development through the preparation and execution of market objectives, policies and programs.
  • Commissions and undertakes market research to identify market opportunities for new and existing goods and services.
  • Advises on all elements of marketing such as product mix, pricing, advertising and sales promotion, selling, and distribution channels.

More about Advertising and Marketing Professionals

All Advertising and Marketing Professionals

  • $1,737 Weekly Pay
  • Strong Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Marketing Specialists

  • 51,400 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 77% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 44 hours Average full-time
  • 35 years Average age
  • 61% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Marketing Specialists (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
from 37,100 in 2011 to 51,400 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Location: Many Marketing Specialists work in New South Wales.
  • Industries: They work in many industries such as Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; Wholesale Trade; and Retail Trade.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (77%, higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 44 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 35 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 61% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services24.9
Wholesale Trade9.4
Retail Trade8.4
Manufacturing8.4
Other Industries48.9

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMarketing SpecialistsAll Jobs Average
NSW41.731.6
VIC30.325.6
QLD15.020.0
SA4.37.0
WA6.810.8
TAS0.82.0
NT0.31.0
ACT0.91.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMarketing SpecialistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.6-5.05.0
20-248.7-9.39.3
25-3439.7-22.922.9
35-4428.6-22.022.0
45-5414.9-21.621.6
55-593.6-9.09.0
60-642.2-6.06.0
65 and Over1.8-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMarketing SpecialistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate17.7-10.110.1
Bachelor degree48.4-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma11.4-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV5.9-21.121.1
Year 1213.1-18.118.1
Year 111.4-4.84.8
Year 10 and below2.1-12.512.5

You usually need a bachelor degree in marketing, business management, communications, commerce or another related field to work as a Marketing Specialist. Training may also be available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Retail Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Advertising and Marketing Professionals who have strong interpersonal skills and are highly organised.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Sales and marketing

    86% Skill level

    Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  2. English language

    72% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  3. Customer and personal service

    69% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Administration and management

    66% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

  5. Mathematics

    63% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-2021.00 - Marketing Managers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Electronic mail

    100% Important

    Use electronic mail.

  2. Telephone

    98% Important

    Talk on the telephone.

  3. Face-to-face discussions

    95% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  4. Teamwork

    93% Important

    Work with people in a group or team.

  5. Unstructured work

    93% Important

    Have freedom to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-2021.00 - Marketing Managers.

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