Aquaculture Farmers plan, organise, control, coordinate and perform farming operations to breed and raise fish and other aquatic stock.

Also known as: Marine Farmer.

Specialisations: Seafood Farmer, Fish Farmer, Hatchery Manager (Fish), Mussel Farmer, Oyster Farmer.

You can work as an Aquaculture Farmer without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in aquaculture or marine science might be helpful.

Tasks

  • planning and coordinating the operation of hatcheries to produce fish fry, seed oysters, crayfish, marron and prawns taking into account environmental and market factors
  • monitoring the environment to maintain optimal growing conditions
  • identifying and controlling environmental toxins and diseases
  • monitoring stock growth rates to determine when to harvest
  • transporting fish, crayfish, marron, prawns and sticks of seed oysters to new tanks, ponds, cages and floating net pens
  • directing and overseeing the harvesting, grading and packaging of fish, oysters and other aquatic stock
  • organising the sale, purchase and transportation of fish stock
  • maintaining and evaluating records of farming activities, monitoring market activity and planning production accordingly
  • managing business capital including budgeting, taxation, debt and loan management
  • may select, train and supervise staff and contractors

All Aquaculture Farmers

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 2,700 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 79% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 49 hours Average full-time
  • 45 years Average age
  • 15% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Aquaculture Farmers (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
from 2,700 in 2018 to 2,600 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be less than 1,000 job openings over 5 years.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
  • Location: Aquaculture Farmers work in many parts of Australia. Tasmania and South Australia have a large share of workers.
  • Industries: Most work in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (79%, higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 49 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 45 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (52%).
  • Gender: 15% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20081400
20093100
20101800
20112500
20121100
20132200
20142700
20151700
20162300
20174400
20182700
20232600

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing93.1
Wholesale Trade2.1
Retail Trade1.2
Manufacturing1.0
Other Industries2.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateAquaculture FarmersAll Jobs Average
NSW28.531.6
VIC8.425.6
QLD13.520.0
SA16.17.0
WA7.510.8
TAS24.02.0
NT1.71.0
ACT0.01.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketAquaculture FarmersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-192.5-5.05.0
20-247.0-9.39.3
25-3417.8-22.922.9
35-4421.0-22.022.0
45-5422.3-21.621.6
55-5910.7-9.09.0
60-648.8-6.06.0
65 and Over10.0-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationAquaculture FarmersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate3.3-10.110.1
Bachelor degree15.7-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma9.2-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV24.0-21.121.1
Year 1216.2-18.118.1
Year 116.2-4.84.8
Year 10 and below25.5-12.512.5

You can work as an Aquaculture Farmer without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in aquaculture or marine science might be helpful.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Seafood Industry VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Aquaculture Farmers who work well in a team, communicate clearly and who are reliable.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Biology

    67% Skill level

    Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

  2. Food production

    64% Skill level

    Planting, growing, and harvesting food (both plant and animal), including storage and handling.

  3. Customer and personal service

    63% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  4. Administration and management

    62% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

  5. Mechanical

    62% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-9013.03 - Aquacultural Managers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Face-to-face discussions

    99% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  2. Telephone

    94% Important

    Talk on the telephone.

  3. Outdoors, exposed to weather

    92% Important

    Work outdoors, exposed to the weather.

  4. Electronic mail

    91% Important

    Use electronic mail.

  5. Contact with people

    86% Important

    Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-9013.03 - Aquacultural Managers.

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