Retail Managers organise and control the operations of establishments which provide retail services.

    You can work as a Retail Manager without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. It is common for Retail Managers (General) to complete a VET (Vocational Education and Training) course in retail or retail management, courses may be done through a Traineeship.

    Tasks

    • determining product mix, stock levels and service standards
    • formulating and implementing purchasing and marketing policies, and setting prices
    • promoting and advertising the establishment's goods and services
    • selling goods and services to customers and advising them on product use
    • maintaining records of stock levels and financial transactions
    • undertaking budgeting for the establishment
    • controlling selection, training and supervision of staff
    • ensuring compliance with occupational health and safety regulations

    All Retail Managers

    • $1,440 Weekly Pay
    • Stable Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 233,300 workers Employment Size
    • High skill Skill level rating
    • 82% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 47 hours Average full-time
    • 41 years Average age
    • 50% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Retail Managers (in their main job) grew moderately the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
    from 233,300 in 2018 to 237,600 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 134,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 26,800 a year).

    • Size: This is a very large occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
    • Location: Retail Managers work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Retail Trade; Accommodation and Food Services; and Other Services.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,440 per week (similar to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Most work full-time (82%, much higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 47 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 50% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    2008233500
    2009225100
    2010223100
    2011235600
    2012228400
    2013221500
    2014241300
    2015232200
    2016225300
    2017238400
    2018233300
    2023237600

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsRetail ManagersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings14401460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Retail Trade66.5
    Accommodation and Food Services13.9
    Other Services3.8
    Wholesale Trade3.4
    Other Industries12.4

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateRetail ManagersAll Jobs Average
    NSW30.331.6
    VIC26.225.6
    QLD20.920.0
    SA7.47.0
    WA10.610.8
    TAS2.22.0
    NT0.91.0
    ACT1.51.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketRetail ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191.9-5.05.0
    20-248.8-9.39.3
    25-3424.5-22.922.9
    35-4422.3-22.022.0
    45-5422.9-21.621.6
    55-599.1-9.09.0
    60-645.8-6.06.0
    65 and Over4.7-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationRetail ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate4.9-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree14.8-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma13.3-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV18.4-21.121.1
    Year 1227.5-18.118.1
    Year 116.2-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below14.7-12.512.5

    You can work as a Retail Manager without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. It is common for Retail Managers (General) to complete a VET (Vocational Education and Training) course in retail or retail management, courses may be done through a Traineeship.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Retail Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Retail Managers who provide good customer service, have strong people skills, are organised and well presented. Employers also value responsible and trustworthy managers.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      77% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Education and Training

      61% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    3. Administration and Management

      60% Skill level

      Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

    4. Sales and Marketing

      59% Skill level

      Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

    5. English Language

      54% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-1011.00 - First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Telephone

      100% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    2. Contact With Others

      97% Important

      How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

    3. Deal With External Customers

      94% Important

      How important is it to work with customers or the public?

    4. Face-to-Face Discussions

      93% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    5. Indoors, Heat Controlled

      92% Important

      How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 41-1011.00 - First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers.

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