Sports Centre Managers manage sports centres.

Specialisations: Aquatic Centre Manager, Golf Course Manager, Indoor Sports Centre Manager, Squash Centre Manager, Stadium Manager, Ten Pin Bowling Centre Manager, Tennis Centre Manager.

Management experience or extensive industry experience is needed to work as a Sports Centre Manager. Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. A course in business, management or fitness might be helpful.

Tasks

  • Organises publicity to promote facilities and attract clients.
  • Selects, trains and supervises staff.
  • Schedules games and competitions.
  • Ensures facilities are properly maintained and conform to safety standards.
  • May plan and organise catering facilities.

More about Amusement, Fitness and Sports Centre Managers

All Amusement, Fitness and Sports Centre Managers

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • Very strong Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Sports Centre Managers

  • 4,200 workers Employment Size
  • High skill Skill level rating
  • 69% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 45 hours Average full-time
  • 40 years Average age
  • 42% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Sports Centre Managers (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
from 3,600 in 2011 to 4,200 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Sports Centre Managers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Arts and Recreation Services; Education and Training; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (69%, similar to the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 40 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 42% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Arts and Recreation Services57.5
Education and Training19.6
Public Administration and Safety11.5
Accommodation and Food Services3.7
Other Industries7.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateSports Centre ManagersAll Jobs Average
NSW28.031.6
VIC29.625.6
QLD18.420.0
SA6.07.0
WA13.610.8
TAS1.62.0
NT0.91.0
ACT1.81.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketSports Centre ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-193.6-5.05.0
20-2412.5-9.39.3
25-3422.9-22.922.9
35-4421.3-22.022.0
45-5422.3-21.621.6
55-598.5-9.09.0
60-645.0-6.06.0
65 and Over3.8-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationSports Centre ManagersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate4.9-10.110.1
Bachelor degree22.4-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma16.3-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV19.3-21.121.1
Year 1224.0-18.118.1
Year 114.5-4.84.8
Year 10 and below8.5-12.512.5

Management experience or extensive industry experience is needed to work as a Sports Centre Manager. Formal qualifications might be useful but aren't essential. A course in business, management or fitness might be helpful.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • working with vulnerable people and children check
  • first aid certificate

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Tourism, Travel and Hospitality VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Amusement, Fitness and Sports Centre Managers who can provide good customer service, have strong people skills, and are well organised and presented. Employers also value responsible and trustworthy managers.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Education and Training

    70% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    68% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. Sales and Marketing

    62% Skill level

    Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

  4. Psychology

    61% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

  5. English Language

    60% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-9039.02 - Fitness and Wellness Coordinators.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Electronic Mail

    98% Important

    How often do you use electronic mail?

  2. Telephone

    97% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

  3. Face-to-Face Discussions

    95% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  4. Contact With Others

    91% Important

    How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

  5. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    90% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 11-9039.02 - Fitness and Wellness Coordinators.

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