Vocational Education Teachers teach one or more subjects within a prescribed course of study at technical and further education (TAFE) institutes, polytechnics and other training institutes to tertiary students for vocational education and training purposes.

Specialisations: Adult Education Teacher, TAFE Lecturer, TAFE Teacher, Workplace Trainer and Assessor.

A relevant formal qualification and extensive practical or industry experience in your area of expertise is needed to become a Vocational Education Teacher. You also need to complete a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

Tasks

  • identifying the various needs of students and creating effective learning options to meet these needs
  • liaising with individuals, industry and education sectors to ensure provision of relevant programs and services
  • planning, designing and developing course curriculum and method of instruction
  • advising students on courses and related matters
  • teaching students using teaching aids including presentation of lesson materials, discussions, workshops, laboratory sessions, multimedia aids and computer tutorials
  • marking and grading students' assignments, papers and exams and providing feedback to students about their progress
  • maintaining records of students' progress, attendance and training activities
  • consulting with Education Managers, Librarians, Student Counsellors and other support staff

All Vocational Education Teachers

  • $1,790 Weekly Pay
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Average unemployment Unemployment
  • 30,400 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 58% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 42 hours Average full-time
  • 50 years Average age
  • 51% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Vocational Education Teachers (in their main job) fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 30,400 in 2018 to 25,700 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 10,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 2,000 a year).

  • Size: This is a large occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2018.
  • Location: Vocational Education Teachers work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Education and Training; Health Care and Social Assistance; and Public Administration and Safety.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,790 per week (higher than the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: More than half work full-time (58%, similar to the average of 66%), but there are many opportunities to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 50 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (65%).
  • Gender: 51% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
200838300
200943800
201035400
201133700
201237500
201334900
201435500
201533400
201629000
201731000
201830400
202325700

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsVocational Education TeachersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings17901460

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Education and Training79.9
Health Care and Social Assistance3.3
Public Administration and Safety2.8
Administrative and Support Services2.0
Other Industries12.0

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateVocational Education TeachersAll Jobs Average
NSW31.231.6
VIC27.325.6
QLD18.120.0
SA6.87.0
WA12.110.8
TAS2.22.0
NT0.81.0
ACT1.41.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketVocational Education TeachersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.5-5.05.0
20-241.5-9.39.3
25-3411.3-22.922.9
35-4421.2-22.022.0
45-5430.5-21.621.6
55-5916.2-9.09.0
60-6411.7-6.06.0
65 and Over7.0-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationVocational Education TeachersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate24.5-10.110.1
Bachelor degree26.3-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma24.4-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV19.8-21.121.1
Year 123.1-18.118.1
Year 110.6-4.84.8
Year 10 and below1.3-12.512.5

A relevant formal qualification and extensive practical or industry experience in your area of expertise is needed to become a Vocational Education Teacher. You also need to complete a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Training and Education VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Vocational Education Teachers who are trustworthy and responsible, motivated and have good interpersonal skills.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Education and Training

    81% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  2. Customer and Personal Service

    65% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  3. English Language

    63% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Psychology

    52% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

  5. Personnel and Human Resources

    48% Skill level

    Recruiting and training people, managing pay and other entitlements (like sick leave), and negotiating pay and conditions.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 25-1194.00 - Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Contact With Others

    92% Important

    How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

  2. Face-to-Face Discussions

    89% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  3. Freedom to Make Decisions

    86% Important

    How much freedom do you have to make decision on your own?

  4. Physical Proximity

    86% Important

    How physically close are you to other people?

  5. Structured versus Unstructured Work

    86% Important

    How much freedom do you have to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 25-1194.00 - Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary.

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