Industrial Pharmacists undertake research, testing and analysis related to the development, production, storage, quality control and distribution of drugs and related supplies.

    A bachelor degree in pharmacy is needed to work as an Industrial Pharmacist. Many Industrial Pharmacists complete postgraduate studies.

    Tasks

    • Conducts research to develop and improve pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and related chemical products.
    • Confers with chemists, engineering professionals and other professionals about manufacturing techniques and ingredients.
    • Tests and analyses drugs to determine their identity, purity and strength in relation to specified standards.
    • Develops standards for drugs used in pharmaceuticals.

    More about Pharmacists

    All Pharmacists

    • $1,862 Weekly Pay
    • Moderate Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment

    Industrial Pharmacists

    • 830 workers Employment Size
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • 84% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 42 hours Average full-time
    • 38 years Average age
    • 54% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Industrial Pharmacists (in their main job) stayed about the same over 5 years:
    from 860 in 2011 to 830 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Industrial Pharmacists work in many parts of Australia. Victoria has a large share of workers.
    • Industries: Most work in Manufacturing; Professional, Scientific and Technical Services; and Education and Training.
    • Full-time: Most work full-time (84%, much higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 38 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 54% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Manufacturing56.0
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services17.7
    Education and Training8.9
    Wholesale Trade6.7
    Other Industries10.7

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateIndustrial PharmacistsAll Jobs Average
    NSW24.131.6
    VIC47.325.6
    QLD13.520.0
    SA6.27.0
    WA4.810.8
    TAS1.82.0
    NT0.01.0
    ACT2.41.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketIndustrial PharmacistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.0-5.05.0
    20-245.7-9.39.3
    25-3432.2-22.922.9
    35-4431.6-22.022.0
    45-5419.8-21.621.6
    55-595.7-9.09.0
    60-642.7-6.06.0
    65 and Over2.3-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationIndustrial PharmacistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate47.0-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree47.0-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma2.6-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV0.0-21.121.1
    Year 123.4-18.118.1
    Year 110.0-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below0.0-12.512.5

    A bachelor degree in pharmacy is needed to work as an Industrial Pharmacist. Many Industrial Pharmacists complete postgraduate studies.

    You must also be registered with the Pharmacy Board of Australia.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • to complete an intern training program

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Pharmacists who can connect with others, provide good customer service and have good communication skills.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Biology

      83% Skill level

      Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

    2. Chemistry

      73% Skill level

      Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

    3. English Language

      72% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    4. Mathematics

      68% Skill level

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    5. Computers and Electronics

      65% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-1042.00 - Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Electronic Mail

      100% Important

      How often do you use electronic mail?

    2. Being Exact or Accurate

      96% Important

      How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

    3. Face-to-Face Discussions

      96% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    4. Indoors, Heat Controlled

      95% Important

      How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

    5. Work With Work Group or Team

      95% Important

      How important is it to work with others in a group or team?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 19-1042.00 - Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists.

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