Ministers of Religion perform spiritual functions associated with beliefs and practices of religious faiths, and provide motivation, guidance and training in religious life for the people of congregations and parishes, and the wider community.

Specialisations: Aboriginal Ceremonial Celebrant, Chaplain, Imam, Monk, Priest, Rabbi, Salvation Army Officer.

Entry requirements for Ministers of Religion vary depending on the religion or denomination. While you can work as a Minister without formal qualification for some religions, others may require formal qualifications in religion, ministry, theology or a related field. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Ministers of Religion.

Tasks

  • preparing and conducting services of public worship and acknowledgments of faith
  • preparing and delivering sermons, homilies and special talks, and planning music for services
  • participating in the social and welfare activities of communities, encouraging people to be aware of their responsibilities, and organising participation in community projects
  • conducting classes of religious instruction, and supervising prayer and discussion groups, retreats and seminars
  • conducting premarital and family counselling and referring people to professional service agencies where necessary
  • performing marriages, funerals and special memorial services according to tradition and ecclesiastical and civil law
  • visiting members of the community in their homes, hospitals and other institutions to provide advice and religious comfort
  • keeping records as required by the church and civil law

All Ministers of Religion

  • Unavailable Weekly Pay
  • Moderate Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment
  • 19,600 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 70% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 48 hours Average full-time
  • 49 years Average age
  • 29% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Ministers of Religion (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow over the next 5 years:
from 19,600 in 2018 to 20,200 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 12,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 2,400 a year).

  • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
  • Location: Ministers of Religion work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Other Services; Education and Training; and Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Full-time: Many work full-time (70%, similar to the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 48 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 49 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (62%).
  • Gender: 29% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
200815300
200916000
201016500
201115900
201215300
201316700
201418600
201514300
201618000
201721900
201819600
202320200

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Other Services77.9
Education and Training10.7
Health Care and Social Assistance8.7
Public Administration and Safety1.2
Other Industries1.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMinisters of ReligionAll Jobs Average
NSW34.131.6
VIC22.325.6
QLD20.420.0
SA7.57.0
WA11.210.8
TAS2.12.0
NT0.81.0
ACT1.71.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMinisters of ReligionAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.2-5.05.0
20-242.6-9.39.3
25-3414.0-22.922.9
35-4421.1-22.022.0
45-5424.9-21.621.6
55-5912.8-9.09.0
60-6412.0-6.06.0
65 and Over12.2-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMinisters of ReligionAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate29.2-10.110.1
Bachelor degree40.1-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma16.9-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV5.6-21.121.1
Year 125.3-18.118.1
Year 110.7-4.84.8
Year 10 and below2.1-12.512.5

Entry requirements for Ministers of Religion vary depending on the religion or denomination. While you can work as a Minister without formal qualification for some religions, others may require formal qualifications in religion, ministry, theology or a related field. VET (Vocational Education and Training) and university are both common study pathways for Ministers of Religion.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • national police check
  • working with vulnerable people and children check

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Community Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Ministers of Religion who are caring and empathetic and can work well in a team, with the ability to communicate with a diverse range of people.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Philosophy and theology

    94% Skill level

    Philosophical systems and religions, including their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and impact on society.

  2. Therapy and counselling

    76% Skill level

    Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and career counselling and guidance.

  3. Education and training

    70% Skill level

    Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

  4. English language

    70% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  5. Psychology

    68% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 21-2011.00 - Clergy.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Contact with people

    96% Important

    Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

  2. Face-to-face discussions

    96% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  3. Electronic mail

    95% Important

    Use electronic mail.

  4. Teamwork

    94% Important

    Work with people in a group or team.

  5. Unstructured work

    94% Important

    Have freedom to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 21-2011.00 - Clergy.

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