Telecommunications Technical Officer or Technologists carry out specialised design and support functions in telecommunications engineering including optimisation and performance monitoring of telecommunications networks, diagnosis and repair of faults, and the selection and installation of equipment.

    You usually need a diploma or advanced diploma in telecommunications to work as a Telecommunications Technical Officer or Technologist.

    Tasks

    • Installs, maintains and diagnoses malfunctions of microwave, telemetry, satellite and other radio and electromagnetic communication systems.
    • Configures and integrates networks and technology with computer software, hardware, desktops, peripherals, databases and operating systems.
    • Develops and records logs of the details, locations and statuses of inventories, parts, equipment and instruments and maintains the documentation of communication policies, procedures, guidelines and regulations, and quality standards.
    • Provides technical advice and information, and monitors the performance of complex networks and equipment.
    • Plans the development of customer access network infrastructure.
    • Liaise with vendors, suppliers, service providers and external resources and monitors contractual obligations and performance delivery.
    • Provides ongoing support in designing, optimising, troubleshooting, diagnosing, repairing and resolving of network performance malfunctions, defects and faults.

    More about Telecommunications Technical Specialists

    All Telecommunications Technical Specialists

    • Unavailable Weekly Pay
    • Moderate Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment

    Telecommunications Technical Officers and Technologists

    • 840 workers Employment Size
    • High skill Skill level rating
    • 91% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 41 hours Average full-time
    • 49 years Average age
    • 11% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Telecommunications Technical Officers and Technologists (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
    from 1,200 in 2011 to 840 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Telecommunications Technical Officers and Technologists work in many parts of Australia. Victoria has a large share of workers.
    • Industries: Most work in Information Media and Telecommunications; Public Administration and Safety; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
    • Full-time: Most work full-time (91%, much higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 49 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (63%).
    • Gender: 11% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Information Media and Telecommunications61.0
    Public Administration and Safety7.5
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services6.4
    Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services3.5
    Other Industries21.6

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateTelecommunications Technical Officers and TechnologistsAll Jobs Average
    NSW26.431.6
    VIC37.125.6
    QLD15.520.0
    SA7.67.0
    WA6.810.8
    TAS3.42.0
    NT0.41.0
    ACT2.91.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketTelecommunications Technical Officers and TechnologistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.0-5.05.0
    20-242.6-9.39.3
    25-3415.0-22.922.9
    35-4419.0-22.022.0
    45-5433.8-21.621.6
    55-5914.2-9.09.0
    60-6411.3-6.06.0
    65 and Over4.1-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationTelecommunications Technical Officers and TechnologistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate5.6-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree14.2-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma38.7-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV28.9-21.121.1
    Year 129.0-18.118.1
    Year 111.3-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below2.3-12.512.5

    You usually need a diploma or advanced diploma in telecommunications to work as a Telecommunications Technical Officer or Technologist.

    You must also be registered with the Australian Communication and Media Authority.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Transmission & Distribution VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Telecommunications Technical Specialists who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Telecommunications

      86% Skill level

      Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

    2. Customer and personal service

      73% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    3. Computers and electronics

      70% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    4. Mathematics

      65% Skill level

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    5. Administration and management

      61% Skill level

      Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-1143.01 - Telecommunications Engineering Specialists.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Electronic mail

      98% Important

      Use electronic mail.

    2. Telephone

      98% Important

      Talk on the telephone.

    3. Face-to-face discussions

      92% Important

      Talk with people face-to-face.

    4. Contact with people

      88% Important

      Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

    5. Indoors, heat controlled

      86% Important

      Work indoors with access to heating or cooling.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 15-1143.01 - Telecommunications Engineering Specialists.

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