Motor Mechanics (General) maintain, test and repair petrol engines and the mechanical parts of lightweight motor vehicles such as transmissions, suspension, steering and brakes.

Also known as: Automotive Light Mechanic.

Specialisations: Automatic Transmission Mechanic, Automotive Airconditioning Mechanic, Brake Mechanic, Ground Support Equipment Fitter (Air Force), Roadside Mechanic, Vehicle Mechanic (Army).

Either extensive experience or a certificate III in light vehicle mechanical technology is needed to work as a Motor Mechanic (General).

Tasks

  • Diagnoses faults in engines and parts.
  • Dismantles and removes engine assemblies, transmissions, steering mechanisms and other components, and checks parts.
  • Repairs and replaces worn and defective parts and reassembles mechanical components, referring to service manuals as needed.
  • Performs scheduled maintenance services to achieve smoother running of vehicles and ensure compliance with pollution regulations.
  • Reassembles engines and parts after being repaired.
  • Tests and adjusts mechanical parts after being repaired for proper performance, diagnoses and test parts with the assistance of computers.
  • May inspect vehicles and issue roadworthiness certificates or detail work required to achieve roadworthiness.

All Motor Mechanics

  • $1,436 Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Motor Mechanics (General)

  • 73,500 workers Employment Size
  • Medium skill Skill level rating
  • 90% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 44 hours Average full-time
  • 37 years Average age
  • 1% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Motor Mechanics (General) (in their main job) grew moderately over 5 years:
from 71,100 in 2011 to 73,500 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very large occupation.
  • Location: Motor Mechanics (General) work in many regions of Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Other Services; Retail Trade; and Wholesale Trade.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (90%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 44 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 37 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 1% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employers found it hard to fill vacancies for Motor Mechanics in 2018. Find out more in the Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business latest report on Motor Mechanics.

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Other Services60.0
Retail Trade18.5
Wholesale Trade3.7
Manufacturing3.7
Other Industries14.1

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMotor Mechanics (General)All Jobs Average
NSW30.631.6
VIC24.825.6
QLD20.920.0
SA7.27.0
WA12.010.8
TAS2.02.0
NT1.41.0
ACT1.21.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMotor Mechanics (General)All Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-196.5-5.05.0
20-2414.6-9.39.3
25-3424.3-22.922.9
35-4419.3-22.022.0
45-5418.9-21.621.6
55-598.1-9.09.0
60-645.2-6.06.0
65 and Over3.1-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMotor Mechanics (General)All Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.3-10.110.1
Bachelor degree1.8-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma4.8-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV75.6-21.121.1
Year 128.1-18.118.1
Year 113.0-4.84.8
Year 10 and below6.3-12.512.5

Either extensive experience or a certificate III in light vehicle mechanical technology is needed to work as a Motor Mechanic (General).

Registration with the relevant state or territory board may be needed to work as a Motor Mechanic (General).

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • driver's licence
  • Psychometric or aptitude tests

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Automotive Retail, Service and Repair and Automotive Manufacturing Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Motor Mechanics who are hardworking with a good work ethic, reliable and provide good customer service.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    84% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Computers and electronics

    57% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  3. Engineering and technology

    56% Skill level

    Use engineering, science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  4. Customer and personal service

    55% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  5. Physics

    48% Skill level

    The physical laws of matter, motion and energy, and how they interact through space and time.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-3023.01 - Automotive Master Mechanics.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Exposure to contaminants

    99% Important

    Be exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours.

  2. In an enclosed vehicle or equipment

    93% Important

    Work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car).

  3. Spend time standing

    93% Important

    Spend time standing at work.

  4. Wear common protective or safety equipment

    93% Important

    Wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets.

  5. Being exact or accurate

    92% Important

    Be very exact or highly accurate.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-3023.01 - Automotive Master Mechanics.

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