Telecommunications Trades Workers install, maintain and repair data transmission equipment, aerial lines, conduits, cables, radio antennae and telecommunications equipment and appliances.

    Either extensive experience or a certificate III in telecommunications technology is needed to work as a Telecommunications Trades Worker.

    Tasks

    • examining drawings, specifications and work areas to determine positioning and connections for equipment to be installed
    • locating faults in telecommunications equipment using instruments such as ohmmeters, voltmeters, ammeters and transmission measuring equipment
    • attaching wires and cables to appliances
    • adjusting, replacing and repairing faulty items, and testing equipment using electronic instruments
    • installing cabling for telephone, radio, pay TV and computer transmission
    • joining cables and sealing sheaths with lead and thermoplastic
    • erecting, testing and maintaining aerial and underground wires and cables, and radio and mobile phone antennae
    • installing telecommunications equipment and appliances such as telephones, switchboards and data transmission equipment

    All Telecommunications Trades Workers

    • $1,656 Weekly Pay
    • Decline Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment
    • 26,900 workers Employment Size
    • Medium skill Skill level rating
    • 85% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 43 hours Average full-time
    • 40 years Average age
    • 4% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Telecommunications Trades Workers (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
    from 26,900 in 2018 to 24,700 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 13,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 2,600 a year).

    • Size: This is a large occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was below average in 2018.
    • Location: Telecommunications Trades Workers work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Information Media and Telecommunications; Construction; and Other Services.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,656 per week (very high compared to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Most work full-time (85%, much higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 40 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 4% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    The Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business talks with employers who have tried to fill vacancies. Find out more in the latest report on Telecommunications Trades Workers.

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200822300
    200915700
    201022900
    201122100
    201217300
    201321700
    201424000
    201522300
    201624300
    201718700
    201826900
    202324700

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsTelecommunications Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings16561460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Information Media and Telecommunications61.0
    Construction16.5
    Other Services5.0
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services4.4
    Other Industries13.1

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateTelecommunications Trades WorkersAll Jobs Average
    NSW31.031.6
    VIC23.025.6
    QLD20.920.0
    SA7.77.0
    WA11.810.8
    TAS2.52.0
    NT1.51.0
    ACT1.61.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketTelecommunications Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-192.2-5.05.0
    20-249.2-9.39.3
    25-3425.9-22.922.9
    35-4422.0-22.022.0
    45-5422.8-21.621.6
    55-599.6-9.09.0
    60-646.4-6.06.0
    65 and Over2.0-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationTelecommunications Trades WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.7-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree8.6-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma12.7-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV49.2-21.121.1
    Year 1213.8-18.118.1
    Year 114.2-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below8.8-12.512.5

    Either extensive experience or a certificate III in telecommunications technology is needed to work as a Telecommunications Trades Worker.

    Registration with the relevant state or territory board may be needed to work as a Telecommunications Trades Worker.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • construction induction card (white card)
    • working at heights ticket
    • elevated platform ticket
    • forklift licence

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Information and Communications Technology VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Telecommunications Trades Workers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Telecommunications

      76% Skill level

      Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

    2. Customer and personal service

      67% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    3. Computers and electronics

      64% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    4. Mechanical

      59% Skill level

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    5. Education and training

      53% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-2022.00 - Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Telephone

      92% Important

      Talk on the telephone.

    2. In an enclosed vehicle or equipment

      92% Important

      Work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car).

    3. Face-to-face discussions

      90% Important

      Talk with people face-to-face.

    4. Contact with people

      88% Important

      Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

    5. Freedom to make decisions

      87% Important

      Have freedom to make decision on your own.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 49-2022.00 - Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers.

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