Pet Groomers wash, dry, brush, comb, cut and style pets' coats, clip their nails and clean their ears.

    You can work as a Pet Groomer without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. A course in pet grooming might be helpful.

    Tasks

    • Bathes, cuts, combs, blow dries and styles pets' coats, clips their nails and cleans their ears.

    All Animal Attendants and Trainers

    • $986 Weekly Pay
    • Strong Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment

    Pet Groomers

    • 4,100 workers Employment Size
    • Medium skill Skill level rating
    • 35% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 42 hours Average full-time
    • 40 years Average age
    • 85% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Pet Groomers (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
    from 3,100 in 2011 to 4,100 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Pet Groomers work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Other Services; Retail Trade; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
    • Full-time: Less than half work full-time (35%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 40 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 85% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Other Services88.2
    Retail Trade6.2
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services4.1
    Administrative and Support Services0.5
    Other Industries1.0

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StatePet GroomersAll Jobs Average
    NSW27.631.6
    VIC24.625.6
    QLD23.420.0
    SA7.87.0
    WA12.510.8
    TAS1.92.0
    NT0.61.0
    ACT1.51.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketPet GroomersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-195.2-5.05.0
    20-2411.2-9.39.3
    25-3421.4-22.922.9
    35-4422.4-22.022.0
    45-5425.3-21.621.6
    55-597.2-9.09.0
    60-644.8-6.06.0
    65 and Over2.5-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationPet GroomersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate1.9-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree7.0-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma10.7-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV22.5-21.121.1
    Year 1225.3-18.118.1
    Year 119.2-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below23.4-12.512.5

    You can work as a Pet Groomer without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. A course in pet grooming might be helpful.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Animal Care and Management VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Animal Attendants and Trainers who are reliable, work well in a team and have a strong work ethic.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      52% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. English Language

      38% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    3. Mechanical

      35% Skill level

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    4. Education and Training

      34% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    5. Biology

      33% Skill level

      Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-2021.00 - Nonfarm Animal Caretakers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Face-to-Face Discussions

      91% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    2. Telephone

      89% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    3. Contact With Others

      88% Important

      How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

    4. Structured versus Unstructured Work

      86% Important

      How much freedom do you have to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals?

    5. Sounds, Loud or Uncomfortable

      85% Important

      How often are you there sounds and noise levels that are distracting or uncomfortable?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-2021.00 - Nonfarm Animal Caretakers.

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