Child Carers provide care and supervision for children in residential homes and non-residential childcare centres.

    You usually need a formal qualification in early childhood education and care (certificate iii or diploma) to work as a Child Carer. These courses are often undertaken through a traineeship.

    Tasks

    • assisting in the preparation of materials and equipment for children's education and recreational activities
    • managing children's behaviour and guiding children's social development
    • preparing and conducting activities for children
    • entertaining children by reading and playing games
    • supervising children in recreational activities
    • supervising the daily routine of children
    • supervising the hygiene of children

    All Child Carers

    • $953 Weekly Pay
    • Very strong Future Growth
    • Average unemployment Unemployment
    • 156,300 workers Employment Size
    • Lower skill Skill level rating
    • 47% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 41 hours Average full-time
    • 33 years Average age
    • 95% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Child Carers (in their main job) grew very strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to grow very strongly over the next 5 years:
    from 156,300 in 2018 to 183,900 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 184,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 36,800 a year).

    • Size: This is a very large occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2018.
    • Location: Child Carers work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Health Care and Social Assistance; Education and Training; and Other Services.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $953 per week (lower than the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Around half work full-time (47%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 33 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are under 25 years of age (27%).
    • Gender: 95% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    The Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business talks with employers who have tried to fill vacancies. Find out more in the latest report on Child Care Workers.

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    2008100100
    2009106800
    2010109100
    2011106400
    2012106600
    2013123500
    2014129800.0
    2015147100
    2016146100
    2017148400
    2018156300
    2023183900

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsChild CarersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings9531460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Health Care and Social Assistance68.1
    Education and Training22.3
    Other Services3.7
    Public Administration and Safety2.3
    Other Industries3.6

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateChild CarersAll Jobs Average
    NSW33.431.6
    VIC26.625.6
    QLD20.920.0
    SA6.57.0
    WA7.510.8
    TAS1.72.0
    NT1.01.0
    ACT2.51.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketChild CarersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-197.1-5.05.0
    20-2419.5-9.39.3
    25-3426.7-22.922.9
    35-4420.4-22.022.0
    45-5416.0-21.621.6
    55-595.6-9.09.0
    60-643.3-6.06.0
    65 and Over1.4-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationChild CarersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate8.9-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree11.7-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma31.8-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV25.6-21.121.1
    Year 1214.9-18.118.1
    Year 112.2-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below4.9-12.512.5

    You usually need a formal qualification in early childhood education and care (certificate iii or diploma) to work as a Child Carer. These courses are often undertaken through a traineeship.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • working with children check
    • first aid certificate
    • CPR certificate
    • training in anaphylaxis and/or asthma management

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Community Services VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Child Carers who are caring, compassionate, empathetic, and interact well with others.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      55% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Education and Training

      44% Skill level

      Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

    3. Psychology

      42% Skill level

      Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

    4. Clerical

      37% Skill level

      Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

    5. English Language

      33% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-9011.00 - Childcare Workers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Work With Work Group or Team

      97% Important

      How important is it to work with others in a group or team?

    2. Contact With Others

      92% Important

      How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

    3. Face-to-Face Discussions

      92% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    4. Physical Proximity

      91% Important

      How physically close are you to other people?

    5. Indoors, Heat Controlled

      85% Important

      How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-9011.00 - Childcare Workers.

    go to top