Gaming Workers provide gaming services within casinos and other gambling establishments.

Also known as: Croupier.

Specialisations: Casino Gaming Inspector, Gaming Pit Boss.

You can work as a Gaming Worker without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Traineeships in hospitality and gaming may be available.

Tasks

  • ensuring that games operating in the casino pit run smoothly
  • monitoring cash drops to cashiers and chip transactions
  • observing incidents and settling disputes arising at gaming tables
  • dealing games in accordance with casino rules, policies and procedures and ensuring that bets are placed within the rules of the game
  • checking that appropriate betting limit signs are in place
  • checking playing cards
  • verifying cash and colour chip change involving larger amounts with the casino gaming inspector
  • advising patrons about the rules and etiquette of games
  • counting the amount of cash chips in the float and entering a closer slip with the corresponding amount in the cash total
  • calculating and paying winning bets

All Gaming Workers

  • $1,317 Weekly Pay
  • Decline Future Growth
  • Higher Unemployment Unemployment
  • 4,000 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 57% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 41 hours Average full-time
  • 33 years Average age
  • 43% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Gaming Workers (in their main job) fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
from 4,000 in 2018 to 3,800 by 2023.
Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
There are likely to be around 3,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 600 a year).

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2018.
  • Location: Gaming Workers work in many parts of Australia. Victoria has a large share of workers.
  • Industries: Most work in Arts and Recreation Services; Accommodation and Food Services; and Education and Training.
  • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,317 per week (similar to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
  • Full-time: More than half work full-time (57%, similar to the average of 66%), but there are many opportunities to work part-time.
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 33 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 43% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
YearNumber of Workers
20086500
20098500
20109600
20116400
20126200
20138300
20145100
20159700
20167000
20177600
20184000
20233800

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
EarningsGaming WorkersAll Jobs Average
Full-Time Earnings13171460

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Arts and Recreation Services77.9
Accommodation and Food Services19.7
Education and Training1.2
Financial and Insurance Services0.5
Other Industries0.7

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateGaming WorkersAll Jobs Average
NSW24.931.6
VIC36.825.6
QLD14.820.0
SA5.67.0
WA13.710.8
TAS1.72.0
NT1.21.0
ACT1.31.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketGaming WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-193.0-5.05.0
20-2418.3-9.39.3
25-3432.9-22.922.9
35-4421.0-22.022.0
45-5416.2-21.621.6
55-595.1-9.09.0
60-642.4-6.06.0
65 and Over1.0-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationGaming WorkersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate4.6-10.110.1
Bachelor degree17.2-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma11.3-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV17.6-21.121.1
Year 1236.4-18.118.1
Year 115.2-4.84.8
Year 10 and below7.7-12.512.5

You can work as a Gaming Worker without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Traineeships in hospitality and gaming may be available.

Checks, licences and tickets

You may need:

  • casino employment licence
  • responsible service of gambling certificate
  • national police check

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Tourism, Travel and Hospitality VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Gaming Workers who have good people skills, provide good customer service and are well presented.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Customer and personal service

    65% Skill level

    Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

  2. Mathematics

    42% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  3. English language

    31% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Psychology

    29% Skill level

    Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

  5. Sales and marketing

    23% Skill level

    Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-3011.00 - Gaming Dealers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Being exact or accurate

    96% Important

    Be very exact or highly accurate.

  2. Contact with people

    92% Important

    Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

  3. Making repetitive motions

    91% Important

    Spend time making repetitive motions.

  4. Indoors, heat controlled

    90% Important

    Work indoors with access to heating or cooling.

  5. Physically close to people

    89% Important

    Work physically close to other people.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 39-3011.00 - Gaming Dealers.

go to top