Travel Attendants provide services for the safety and comfort of passengers in aircraft, ships and railway sleeping cars.

    You can work as a Travel Attendant without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in hospitality or customer service might be helpful.

    Tasks

    • managing safety and emergency procedures and making public announcements
    • coordinating the sale of goods to passengers and completion of any customs and immigration documentation which may be required
    • conducting safety checks and demonstrations of safety equipment and procedures
    • assisting passengers in emergency drills, carrying out emergency procedures, assisting and directing passengers in emergencies
    • checking passengers' tickets and directing them to seats and cabins
    • tidying aircraft, ship and railway cabins, and receiving and stowing food, equipment and cabin baggage
    • operating galleys, preparing and heating food for passengers, and serving refreshments and meals
    • distributing reading material, pillows, blankets and other amenities for the comfort of passengers

    More about Travel Attendants

    All Travel Attendants

    All Travel Attendants

    • $1,340 Weekly Pay
    • Strong Future Growth
    • Unavailable Unemployment
    • 7,600 workers Employment Size
    • Medium skill Skill level rating
    • 52% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 42 hours Average full-time
    • 38 years Average age
    • 74% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Travel Attendants (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
    from 12,200 in 2014 to 7,600 in 2019.

    Caution: The Australian jobs market is changing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. These estimates do not take account of the impact of COVID-19. They may not reflect the current jobs market and should be used and interpreted with extreme caution.

    • Size: This is a small occupation.
    • Location: Travel Attendants work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in the Transport, Postal and Warehousing industry.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,340 per week (similar to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Around half work full-time (52%, less than the average of 66%), showing there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 42 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 38 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 74% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Caution: The 2019 employment projections do not take account of any impact caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and are therefore no longer reflective of current labour market conditions. As such, they should be used, and interpreted, with extreme caution. Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, National Skills Commission trend data to May 2019 and projections to 2024.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200910900
    20109200
    201113300
    20129200
    201310100
    201412200
    201511300
    201610000
    201713700
    20187500
    20197600
    20248300

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsTravel AttendantsAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings13401460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Transport, Postal and Warehousing94.8
    Administrative and Support Services2.0
    Public Administration and Safety1.4
    Accommodation and Food Services0.9
    Other Industries0.9

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateTravel AttendantsAll Jobs Average
    NSW35.431.6
    VIC22.125.6
    QLD23.820.0
    SA5.37.0
    WA11.210.8
    TAS0.82.0
    NT0.61.0
    ACT0.71.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketTravel AttendantsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191.6-5.05.0
    20-2412.2-9.39.3
    25-3428.1-22.922.9
    35-4422.7-22.022.0
    45-5424.8-21.621.6
    55-597.7-9.09.0
    60-642.2-6.06.0
    65 and Over0.6-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationTravel AttendantsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.4-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree15.4-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma17.1-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV17.7-21.121.1
    Year 1237.2-18.118.1
    Year 114.2-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below6.1-12.512.5

    You can work as a Travel Attendant without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in hospitality or customer service might be helpful.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • Aviation Security Identification Card
    • responsible service of alcohol (RSA) certificate
    • first aid certificate
    • security clearance

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Tourism, Travel and Hospitality VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Travel Attendants who provide good customer service, are reliable and well presented.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and personal service

      88% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Psychology

      66% Skill level

      Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders.

    3. Public safety and security

      52% Skill level

      Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions.

    4. Transportation

      51% Skill level

      Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

    5. Geography

      50% Skill level

      Describing land, sea, and air, including their physical characteristics, locations, how they work together, and the location of plant, animal, and human life.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-2031.00 - Flight Attendants.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Teamwork

      98% Important

      Work with people in a group or team.

    2. Contact with people

      98% Important

      Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

    3. Physically close to people

      96% Important

      Work physically close to other people.

    4. Loud or uncomfortable sounds

      93% Important

      Be exposed to noises and sounds that are distracting or uncomfortable.

    5. Freedom to make decisions

      93% Important

      Have freedom to make decision on your own.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-2031.00 - Flight Attendants.

    go to top