Mail Sorters receive, sort and despatch mail in organisations and postal sorting centres.

    You can work as a Mail Sorter without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

    Tasks

    • receiving and checking incoming mail and mail bags
    • assisting with the verification of registered and special articles
    • operating mail processing equipment such as letter preparation lines, letter indexing and sorting equipment
    • performing manual sorting duties and preparing documentation for despatching mail
    • processing underpaid mail, bulk mail lodgements, express mail and other mail services
    • operating letter indexing and sorting machines, multi-line optical character machines and bar-coding equipment
    • investigating complaints regarding lost items

    More about Mail Sorters

    All Mail Sorters

    All Mail Sorters

    • $1,270 Weekly Pay
    • Decline Future Growth
    • Average unemployment Unemployment
    • 9,300 workers Employment Size
    • Entry level Skill level rating
    • 63% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 41 hours Average full-time
    • 50 years Average age
    • 50% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Mail Sorters (in their main job) fell over the past 5 years and is expected to fall over the next 5 years:
    from 9,300 in 2018 to 8,100 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 4,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 800 a year).

    • Size: This is a small occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was average in 2018.
    • Location: Mail Sorters work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Public Administration and Safety; and Financial and Insurance Services.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,270 per week (below the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (63%, similar to the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 50 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (64%).
    • Gender: 50% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200815000
    200914300
    201013900
    201115000
    201212300
    201313300
    201413800
    201517200
    201614200
    20178900
    20189300
    20238100

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsMail SortersAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings12701460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Transport, Postal and Warehousing84.9
    Public Administration and Safety2.2
    Financial and Insurance Services1.9
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services1.7
    Other Industries9.3

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateMail SortersAll Jobs Average
    NSW33.931.6
    VIC27.725.6
    QLD17.320.0
    SA6.27.0
    WA10.310.8
    TAS1.52.0
    NT0.71.0
    ACT2.41.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketMail SortersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191.6-5.05.0
    20-246.0-9.39.3
    25-3411.7-22.922.9
    35-4417.1-22.022.0
    45-5429.5-21.621.6
    55-5916.3-9.09.0
    60-6411.7-6.06.0
    65 and Over6.1-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationMail SortersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate3.0-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree12.7-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma8.6-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV12.4-21.121.1
    Year 1232.3-18.118.1
    Year 118.4-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below22.7-12.512.5

    You can work as a Mail Sorter without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is also available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Transport and Logistics Training Package VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Employers look for Mail Sorters who are efficient, reliable and have a good work ethic.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. English language

      33% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    2. Clerical

      29% Skill level

      Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work.

    3. Administration and management

      25% Skill level

      Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

    4. Transportation

      25% Skill level

      Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

    5. Computers and electronics

      24% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 43-5053.00 - Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Indoors, heat controlled

      100% Important

      Work indoors with access to heating or cooling.

    2. Time pressure

      94% Important

      Work to strict deadlines.

    3. Making repetitive motions

      91% Important

      Spend time making repetitive motions.

    4. Using your hands to handle, control, or feel

      90% Important

      Spend time using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls.

    5. Loud or uncomfortable sounds

      88% Important

      Be exposed to noises and sounds that are distracting or uncomfortable.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 43-5053.00 - Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators.

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