Train Examiners inspect rolling stock in railway yards, terminals and stations to ensure adherence to safety standards and operational rules and regulations.

Specialisations: Locomotive Inspector.

You can work as a Train Examiner without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. Train Examiners often complete a certificate III or IV.

Tasks

  • Conducts visual checks of the mechanical, structural, electrical, pneumatic and hydraulic systems of railway wagons, carriages and locomotives for condition and correct classification.

All Inspectors and Regulatory Officers

  • $1,424 Weekly Pay
  • Stable Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Train Examiners

  • 150 workers Employment Size
  • Lower skill Skill level rating
  • 93% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 45 hours Average full-time
  • 47 years Average age
  • 14% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Train Examiners (in their main job) stayed about the same over 5 years:
from 160 in 2011 to 150 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Many Train Examiners work in Victoria and Western Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Mining; and Manufacturing.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (93%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 45 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 47 years (compared to the average of 40 years). Many workers are 45 years or older (56%).
  • Gender: 14% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Transport, Postal and Warehousing44.2
Mining33.3
Manufacturing6.8
Public Administration and Safety6.1
Other Industries9.6

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateTrain ExaminersAll Jobs Average
NSW13.231.6
VIC40.325.6
QLD4.420.0
SA6.97.0
WA35.210.8
TAS0.02.0
NT0.01.0
ACT0.01.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketTrain ExaminersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.05.0
20-244.3-9.39.3
25-3419.8-22.922.9
35-4419.8-22.022.0
45-5424.7-21.621.6
55-5915.4-9.09.0
60-6411.1-6.06.0
65 and Over4.9-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationTrain ExaminersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.0-10.110.1
Bachelor degree2.1-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma2.1-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV50.0-21.121.1
Year 1214.1-18.118.1
Year 1112.0-4.84.8
Year 10 and below19.7-12.512.5

You can work as a Train Examiner without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. Train Examiners often complete a certificate III or IV.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
  • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
  • You might be interested in Local Government and Public Sector VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Inspectors and Regulatory Officers who have a good attention to detail, strong people skills and a good work ethic.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Mechanical

    76% Skill level

    Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

  2. Transportation

    48% Skill level

    Moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road.

  3. English language

    47% Skill level

    English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

  4. Computers and electronics

    46% Skill level

    Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

  5. Administration and management

    45% Skill level

    Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-6051.07 - Transportation Vehicle, Equipment and Systems Inspectors, Except Aviation.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Face-to-face discussions

    98% Important

    Talk with people face-to-face.

  2. Contact with people

    94% Important

    Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way.

  3. Frequent decision making

    91% Important

    Frequently make decisions that impact other people.

  4. Loud or uncomfortable sounds

    91% Important

    Be exposed to noises and sounds that are distracting or uncomfortable.

  5. Spend time standing

    88% Important

    Spend time standing at work.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 53-6051.07 - Transportation Vehicle, Equipment and Systems Inspectors, Except Aviation.

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