Other Machine Operators includes a range of occupations such as Chemical Production Machine Operators, Motion Picture Projectionists, Sand Blasters and Sterilisation Technicians.

    You can work as an Other Machine Operator without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. Training is available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

    Tasks

    • operates machines to produce chemical goods such as soaps, detergents, pharmaceuticals, toiletries and explosives
    • operates film projection and related sound reproduction equipment
    • operates sandblasting machines to clean and grind metal products and other hard surfaces
    • cleans, sterilises and packages surgical instruments and other hospital equipment, soft goods and linen in a sterilisation service facility

    All Other Machine Operators

    • $1,387 Weekly Pay
    • Stable Future Growth
    • Higher Unemployment Unemployment
    • 13,700 workers Employment Size
    • Lower skill Skill level rating
    • 68% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 43 hours Average full-time
    • 44 years Average age
    • 38% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Other Machine Operators (in their main job) grew strongly over the past 5 years and is expected to stay about the same over the next 5 years:
    from 13,700 in 2018 to 13,700 by 2023.
    Job openings can come from new jobs being created, but most come from turnover (workers leaving).
    There are likely to be around 7,000 job openings over 5 years (that's about 1,400 a year).

    • Size: This is a medium sized occupation.
    • Unemployment: Unemployment was above average in 2018.
    • Location: Other Machine Operators work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in Health Care and Social Assistance; Manufacturing; and Construction.
    • Earnings: Full-time workers on an adult wage earn around $1,387 per week (similar to the average of $1,460). Earnings tend to be lower when starting out and higher as experience grows.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (68%, similar to the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 43 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 44 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 38% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, Department of Jobs and Small Business trend data to May 2018 and Department of Jobs and Small Business projections to 2023.
    YearNumber of Workers
    200812600
    200912200
    201010200
    201111100
    201210600
    201312300
    20149400
    201512400
    201610700
    201713200
    201813700
    202313700

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    Source: Based on ABS Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours (cat. no. 6306.0), May 2018, Customised Report. Median weekly total cash earnings for full-time non-managerial employees paid at the adult rate. Earnings are before tax and include amounts salary sacrificed. Earnings can vary greatly depending on the skills and experience of the worker and the demands of the role. These figures should be used as a guide only, not to determine a wage rate.
    EarningsOther Machine OperatorsAll Jobs Average
    Full-Time Earnings13871460

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Health Care and Social Assistance36.0
    Manufacturing23.5
    Construction9.3
    Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services7.5
    Other Industries23.7

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateOther Machine OperatorsAll Jobs Average
    NSW30.431.6
    VIC28.525.6
    QLD19.420.0
    SA7.47.0
    WA10.310.8
    TAS2.02.0
    NT0.61.0
    ACT1.31.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketOther Machine OperatorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-193.8-5.05.0
    20-249.0-9.39.3
    25-3418.9-22.922.9
    35-4420.5-22.022.0
    45-5425.9-21.621.6
    55-5911.5-9.09.0
    60-647.2-6.06.0
    65 and Over3.1-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationOther Machine OperatorsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate2.5-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree10.7-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma8.7-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV29.7-21.121.1
    Year 1221.0-18.118.1
    Year 116.7-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below20.5-12.512.5

    You can work as an Other Machine Operator without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. Training is available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Chemical, Hydrocarbons & Refining VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Other Machine Operators who are hardworking, can work well with others and are reliable.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Production and processing

      72% Skill level

      Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

    2. Chemistry

      68% Skill level

      Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

    3. Mechanical

      64% Skill level

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    4. Computers and electronics

      63% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    5. Engineering and technology

      58% Skill level

      Use engineering, science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9011.00 - Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Wear common protective or safety equipment

      100% Important

      Wear equipment like safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hard hats or life jackets.

    2. Face-to-face discussions

      94% Important

      Talk with people face-to-face.

    3. Exposure to contaminants

      94% Important

      Be exposed to pollutants, gases, dust or odours.

    4. Dangerous conditions

      91% Important

      Work near dangers like high voltage electricity, flammable material, explosives or chemicals.

    5. Health and safety of others

      89% Important

      Take responsibility for the health and safety of others.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 51-9011.00 - Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders.

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