Hunter-Trappers hunt, trap and shoot animals for food, pelts, research, and pest control.

    You can work as a Hunter-Trapper without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

    Tasks

    • Travels to allocated shooting areas on foot or by helicopter and stalks, shoots or traps animals.
    • Lays poison and sets traps.
    • Checks traps to remove carcasses.
    • Removes parts of animal as evidence of kill.
    • Collects sample of animal carcasses for scientific analysis if required.
    • Monitors and records animal population numbers and spread.

    All Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers

    • $1,086 Weekly Pay
    • Moderate Future Growth
    • Average unemployment Unemployment

    Hunter-Trappers

    • 290 workers Employment Size
    • Entry level Skill level rating
    • 64% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 54 hours Average full-time
    • 42 years Average age
    • 4% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Hunter-Trappers (in their main job) stayed about the same over 5 years:
    from 360 in 2011 to 290 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Hunter-Trappers work in many parts of Australia. Queensland has a large share of workers.
    • Industries: Most work in Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Manufacturing; and Administrative and Support Services.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (64%, similar to the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 54 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 42 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 4% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing62.4
    Manufacturing12.2
    Administrative and Support Services8.0
    Public Administration and Safety5.2
    Other Industries12.2

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateHunter-TrappersAll Jobs Average
    NSW23.731.6
    VIC11.325.6
    QLD43.620.0
    SA7.27.0
    WA6.510.8
    TAS5.22.0
    NT1.01.0
    ACT1.41.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketHunter-TrappersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-191.0-5.05.0
    20-249.4-9.39.3
    25-3421.9-22.922.9
    35-4424.9-22.022.0
    45-5424.2-21.621.6
    55-599.1-9.09.0
    60-647.7-6.06.0
    65 and Over1.7-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationHunter-TrappersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate0.0-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree3.3-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma0.0-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV30.3-21.121.1
    Year 1216.2-18.118.1
    Year 113.7-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below46.5-12.512.5

    You can work as a Hunter-Trapper without formal qualifications. Some on the job training may be provided. Training is available through VET (Vocational Education and Training).

    Registration with the relevant state or territory board is needed to work as a Hunter-Trapper.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • firearms licence
    • forklift licence

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Employers look for Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers who are fit, reliable and can work independently when needed but also as part of a team.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and personal service

      55% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Law and government

      47% Skill level

      How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system.

    3. Mechanical

      47% Skill level

      Machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

    4. English language

      45% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    5. Biology

      44% Skill level

      Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 45-3021.00 - Hunters and Trappers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Freedom to make decisions

      99% Important

      Have freedom to make decision on your own.

    2. Outdoors, exposed to weather

      98% Important

      Work outdoors, exposed to the weather.

    3. Unstructured work

      89% Important

      Have freedom to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals.

    4. Using your hands to handle, control, or feel

      84% Important

      Spend time using your hands to handle, control, or feel objects, tools or controls.

    5. In an enclosed vehicle or equipment

      83% Important

      Work in a closed vehicle (e.g., car).

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 45-3021.00 - Hunters and Trappers.

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