Television Presenters prepare and present news, sports or other information, conduct interviews, and introduce music, performances and special events on television.

    You can work as a Television Presenter without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in television, film, or journalism might be helpful.

    Tasks

    • Researches and prepares for programmes and interviews.
    • Finds guests to appear on the show.
    • Prepares scripts.
    • Attends production meetings.
    • Hosts game shows, current affairs, sports, arts or educational programmes.
    • Introduces programmes, music, entertainment items, guests and celebrities.
    • Interviews people.
    • Reads news, sports or weather reports commonly using an autocue.
    • Provides a commentary on live sporting or other events.
    • Presents opinions on sports, politics, social and economic matters.
    • Makes community announcements.
    • Reads advertisements.
    • Presents advertisement interviews (advertorials) with advertising clients.
    • Meets with clients to discuss advertorials.
    • Attends promotional events and social functions.

    More about Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters

    All Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters

    • $2,099 Weekly Pay
    • Decline Future Growth
    • Average unemployment Unemployment

    Television Presenters

    • 430 workers Employment Size
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • 59% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 46 hours Average full-time
    • 41 years Average age
    • 40% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Television Presenters (in their main job) stayed about the same over 5 years:
    from 400 in 2011 to 430 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Television Presenters work in many parts of Australia. New South Wales has a large share of workers.
    • Industries: Most work in Information Media and Telecommunications; Arts and Recreation Services; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
    • Full-time: More than half work full-time (59%, similar to the average of 66%), but there are many opportunities to work part-time.
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 46 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 40% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Information Media and Telecommunications78.4
    Arts and Recreation Services13.2
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services4.0
    Retail Trade3.5
    Other Industries0.9

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateTelevision PresentersAll Jobs Average
    NSW53.231.6
    VIC19.325.6
    QLD13.120.0
    SA4.47.0
    WA6.710.8
    TAS0.02.0
    NT0.01.0
    ACT3.41.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketTelevision PresentersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.7-5.05.0
    20-246.1-9.39.3
    25-3426.2-22.922.9
    35-4429.4-22.022.0
    45-5425.7-21.621.6
    55-593.5-9.09.0
    60-644.7-6.06.0
    65 and Over3.7-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationTelevision PresentersAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate6.2-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree31.8-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma9.7-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV9.2-21.121.1
    Year 1233.7-18.118.1
    Year 112.2-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below7.2-12.512.5

    You can work as a Television Presenter without formal qualifications, however, they may be useful. A course in television, film, or journalism might be helpful.

    Membership with Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance may be useful.

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.
    • Compare Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses, providers and student outcomes on the My Skills website.
    • You might be interested in Creative Arts and Culture VET training pathways on the AAPathways website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters who have strong interpersonal skills, can communicate well with a variety of people and work well in a team.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Communications and Media

      76% Skill level

      Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media.

    2. English Language

      74% Skill level

      English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

    3. Computers and Electronics

      68% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    4. Customer and Personal Service

      66% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    5. Telecommunications

      55% Skill level

      Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-3011.00 - Radio and Television Announcers.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Telephone

      97% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    2. Face-to-Face Discussions

      95% Important

      How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

    3. Frequency of Decision Making

      94% Important

      How often do you make decisions that affect other people?

    4. Impact of Decisions

      94% Important

      What results do your decisions have on other people?

    5. Time Pressure

      94% Important

      How often does this job require the worker to meet strict deadlines?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 27-3011.00 - Radio and Television Announcers.

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