Metallurgists research, develop, control and provide advice on processes used in extracting metals from their ores, and processes used for casting, alloying, heat treating or welding refined metals, alloys and other materials to produce commercial metal products or develop new alloys and processes.

Specialisations: Hydrometallurgical Engineer, Metallographer, Pyrometallurgical Engineer, Radiological Metallurgist.

A bachelor degree in metallurgical or chemical engineering, or a science degree majoring in metallurgy is needed to work as a Metallurgist. Some Metallurgists complete postgraduate studies.

Tasks

  • Measures and records data on performance of metals or metal combinations.
  • Conducts microscopic, x-ray, x-ray diffraction and spectrographic studies of metals and alloys.
  • Evaluates influences of exotic or unusual metals.
  • Studies effect of radiation on metals exposed to space environment and nuclear reactors and joining of diverse materials to form complex structures.
  • Experiments in power metallurgy and the process of compressing metallic powders and sintering them at high temperatures.
  • Evaluates properties of metals and determines type of metal to be used.
  • Advises on shortcomings of metals in use and tests for anticipated use, and tests alloys to study engineering properties and ensure compliance with standards.
  • Develops hot-working and cooling processes to obtain desired characteristics.
  • Gathers information and consults with engineers and company officials to produce alloys at minimum cost, to minimise air pollution and to implement testing procedures.

All Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals

  • $2,094 Weekly Pay
  • Very strong Future Growth
  • Lower unemployment Unemployment

Metallurgists

  • 960 workers Employment Size
  • Very high skill Skill level rating
  • 87% Full-Time Full-Time Share
  • 49 hours Average full-time
  • 41 years Average age
  • 16% female Gender Share

The number of people working as Metallurgists (in their main job) fell over 5 years:
from 1,200 in 2011 to 960 in 2016.

  • Size: This is a very small occupation.
  • Location: Many Metallurgists work in Western Australia.
  • Industries: Most work in Mining; Manufacturing; and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services.
  • Full-time: Most work full-time (87%, much higher than the average of 66%).
  • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 49 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
  • Age: The average age is 41 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
  • Gender: 16% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

Employment Outlook

Number of Workers

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Weekly Earnings

Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

Main Industries

Main Employing Industries (% Share)

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
Mining51.7
Manufacturing21.8
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services21.1
Education and Training2.9
Other Industries2.5

States and Territories

  • NSW

  • VIC

  • QLD

  • SA

  • TAS

  • NT

  • ACT

Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
StateMetallurgistsAll Jobs Average
NSW17.731.6
VIC11.225.6
QLD11.120.0
SA10.17.0
WA46.210.8
TAS2.52.0
NT1.21.0
ACT0.01.9

Age Profile

Age Profile (% Share)

Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
Age BracketMetallurgistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
15-190.0-5.05.0
20-244.8-9.39.3
25-3430.2-22.922.9
35-4423.7-22.022.0
45-5421.3-21.621.6
55-597.4-9.09.0
60-646.3-6.06.0
65 and Over6.2-4.24.2

Education Level

Highest Level of Education (% Share)

Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
Type of QualificationMetallurgistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate24.1-10.110.1
Bachelor degree63.7-21.821.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma7.1-11.611.6
Certificate III/IV2.8-21.121.1
Year 121.9-18.118.1
Year 110.3-4.84.8
Year 10 and below0.0-12.512.5

A bachelor degree in metallurgical or chemical engineering, or a science degree majoring in metallurgy is needed to work as a Metallurgist. Some Metallurgists complete postgraduate studies.

Membership with the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy may be useful.

Thinking about study or training?

Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

  • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
  • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.

Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

Useful links and resources


The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

Employers look for Other Natural and Physical Science Professionals who can communicate clearly, work well in a team and have strong interpersonal skills.

Filter Skills & Knowledge

Knowledge

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

  1. Engineering and Technology

    87% Skill level

    The use engineering science and technology to design and produce goods and services.

  2. Chemistry

    82% Skill level

    Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

  3. Physics

    78% Skill level

    The physical laws of matter, motion and energy, and how they interact through space and time.

  4. Mathematics

    78% Skill level

    Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

  5. Production and Processing

    71% Skill level

    Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2131.00 - Materials Engineers.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

Filter Work Environment

Demands

The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

  1. Electronic Mail

    100% Important

    How often do you use electronic mail?

  2. Telephone

    92% Important

    How often do you talk on the telephone?

  3. Face-to-Face Discussions

    92% Important

    How often do you talk with people face-to-face?

  4. Indoors, Heat Controlled

    92% Important

    How often do you work indoors with access to heating or cooling?

  5. Work With Work Group or Team

    85% Important

    How important is it to work with others in a group or team?

Occupational Information Network
O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 17-2131.00 - Materials Engineers.

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