Nuclear Medicine Technologists perform or assist in performing diagnostic examinations using radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals, and administer radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purposes under the direction of Specialist Medical Practitioners.

    A bachelor degree in nuclear medicine is needed to work as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Some Nuclear Medicine Technologists complete postgraduate studies.

    Tasks

    • Receives referrals to perform medical imaging and radiation treatment.
    • Determines equipment and selects settings to provide the information requested by medical practitioners.
    • Calculates details of procedures such as length and intensity of exposure to radiation, size and strength of dosage of isotopes and settings of recording equipment.
    • Explains procedures to patients and answers queries about processes.
    • Ensures patient's welfare during procedures.
    • Positions patients, screens and equipment preparatory to procedures.
    • Decides if images are satisfactory for diagnostic purposes and selects images to show medical practitioners.
    • Conveys findings of procedures to medical practitioners.

    More about Medical Imaging Professionals

    All Medical Imaging Professionals

    • $2,354 Weekly Pay
    • Strong Future Growth
    • Lower unemployment Unemployment

    Nuclear Medicine Technologists

    • 710 workers Employment Size
    • Very high skill Skill level rating
    • 76% Full-Time Full-Time Share
    • 41 hours Average full-time
    • 34 years Average age
    • 68% female Gender Share

    The number of people working as Nuclear Medicine Technologists (in their main job) grew very strongly over 5 years:
    from 600 in 2011 to 710 in 2016.

    • Size: This is a very small occupation.
    • Location: Nuclear Medicine Technologists work in many regions of Australia.
    • Industries: Most work in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry.
    • Full-time: Many work full-time (76%, higher than the average of 66%).
    • Hours: Full-time workers spend around 41 hours per week at work (compared to the average of 44 hours).
    • Age: The average age is 34 years (compared to the average of 40 years).
    • Gender: 68% of workers are female (compared to the average of 48%).

    Employment Outlook

    Number of Workers

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Weekly Earnings

    Weekly Earnings (Before Tax)

    No data is available for the selected graph for this Occupation.

    Main Industries

    Main Employing Industries (% Share)

    Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Industries are based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC 06).
    Main Employing IndustriesIndustry (% share)
    Health Care and Social Assistance97.9
    Public Administration and Safety1.1
    Professional, Scientific and Technical Services0.6
    Education and Training0.4

    States and Territories

    • NSW

    • VIC

    • QLD

    • SA

    • TAS

    • NT

    • ACT

    Employment by State and Territory (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Share of workers across Australian States and Territories, in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    StateNuclear Medicine TechnologistsAll Jobs Average
    NSW36.831.6
    VIC29.825.6
    QLD16.920.0
    SA5.47.0
    WA6.910.8
    TAS1.62.0
    NT0.01.0
    ACT2.71.9

    Age Profile

    Age Profile (% Share)

    Source: Based on Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.
    Age BracketNuclear Medicine TechnologistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    15-190.0-5.05.0
    20-2410.8-9.39.3
    25-3442.6-22.922.9
    35-4427.7-22.022.0
    45-5410.5-21.621.6
    55-595.0-9.09.0
    60-642.8-6.06.0
    65 and Over0.6-4.24.2

    Education Level

    Highest Level of Education (% Share)

    Source: ABS, ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.
    Type of QualificationNuclear Medicine TechnologistsAll Jobs AverageAll Jobs Average
    Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate13.2-10.110.1
    Bachelor degree80.1-21.821.8
    Advanced Diploma/Diploma5.6-11.611.6
    Certificate III/IV0.0-21.121.1
    Year 121.2-18.118.1
    Year 110.0-4.84.8
    Year 10 and below0.0-12.512.5

    A bachelor degree in nuclear medicine is needed to work as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Some Nuclear Medicine Technologists complete postgraduate studies.

    You must also be registered with the Medical Radiation Practice Board of Australia.

    Checks, licences and tickets

    You may need:

    • radiation licence

    Thinking about study or training?

    Before starting a course, check it will provide you with the skills and qualifications you need.

    • Search and compare thousands of higher education courses, and their entry requirements from different institutions across Australia at Course Seeker website.
    • Compare undergraduate and postgraduate student experiences and outcomes on the QILT website.

    Or check out related courses on Job Outlook.

    Useful links and resources


    The course listings on this page are provided by Good Education Group.

    Employers look for Medical Imaging Professionals who are caring and empathetic and can work well in a team, with the ability to communicate with a diverse range of people.

    Filter Skills & Knowledge

    Knowledge

    These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

    1. Customer and Personal Service

      79% Skill level

      Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction.

    2. Biology

      61% Skill level

      Plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, how they rely on and work with each other and the environment.

    3. Chemistry

      60% Skill level

      Chemical composition, structure, and properties. How chemicals are made, used, mixed, and can change.

    4. Computers and Electronics

      59% Skill level

      Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

    5. Mathematics

      58% Skill level

      Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics.

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 29-2033.00 - Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important.

    Filter Work Environment

    Demands

    The physical and social demands workers face most often are shown below.

    1. Exposed to Radiation

      100% Important

      How often are you exposed to radiation?

    2. Contact With Others

      97% Important

      How much do you have contact with people (face-to-face, by telephone, or any other way)?

    3. Telephone

      96% Important

      How often do you talk on the telephone?

    4. Exposed to Disease or Infections

      94% Important

      How often are you exposed to disease/infections?

    5. Being Exact or Accurate

      93% Important

      How important is being very exact or highly accurate?

    Occupational Information Network
    O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
    The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2, 29-2033.00 - Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

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